retirement

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Retirement

Removal from circulation of stock or bonds that have been reacquired or redeemed.

Retirement

1. The act or process of causing a security to cease to exist. It especially applies to debt securities; when a bond for example matures is said to be retired. However, a stock or other security may also be retired if its issuer buys it back.

2. A situation in which one stops working in one's old age, or at least when one has saved enough money to last the remainder of one's life. Generally, retirement occurs after the age of 65, but this is not a hard-and-fast rule. Both governments and companies offer pensions, annuities, and other plans to provide for one's financial needs in retirement.

retirement

1. The disposal of a fixed asset at the end of its useful life. Retirement may result in a gain or loss, depending upon any compensation received for the asset and whether the asset is carried at a positive book value.
2. The voiding of a firm's own stock that has been reacquired and is being held as Treasury stock.

retirement

the termination of an individual's working career at a certain age with the expectation that he or she will no longer undertake paid employment. In the UK the normal retirement age for men has been 65 and for women 60. European law has a big effect on retirement benefits in the UK. For some time it has been required that men and women have the same pension rights in occupational schemes despite differing retirement ages, thereby meaning that women's benefits are more favourable than men's. The European Court of Justice has now ruled that benefits should be the same. This could mean that the retirement age for women will become 65. Another recent innovation, stemming from the Court, is that part-time workers can no longer be excluded from occupational pension schemes. Until recently many occupational pension schemes excluded part-time workers but the Court has ruled that since many part-time employees are female, exclusion could be a form of DISCRIMINATION.
References in periodicals archive ?
The conventional guideline for retirement investing has been to subtract your age from 100 and let the sum serve as the percentage of your portfolio you should hold in equities.
When asked what changes, if any, the respondents would make to Social Security, only 24 percent would leave the program alone; nearly as many (22 percent) would make Social Security completely voluntary; another 29 percent would either raise the retirement age or cut cost-of-living increases for current retirees.
Of the 190 projected retirements between 1987 to 1999, 108 will be in Field Services.
Sun Life Financial's survey on forced retirement also revealed the following:
Now in his early 30s, he has become a contracted partner with Allstate Financial to help not only ballplayers, but also the clients of Allstate exclusive agents to prepare for retirement.
The income base - the basis for the guaranteed retirement paycheck once withdrawals begin - then becomes the highest of three possible values: the 5% guaranteed growth value based on net contributions; the highest birthday value; or the market value of the participant's account.
Today, NAVA reports that while a majority of Americans acknowledge they may not have enough money for retirement, many also are wary of investing in the stock market, where the historically higher returns may offer the quickest way - or in some cases the only way - to boost their sagging retirement assets.
Today's youngest workers are keenly aware that the existing 'do-it-yourself' approach to managing workplace-provided defined contribution programs isn't delivering the retirement security Americans want and need," said John Y.
As a nation, we need to get our priorities straight, and planning for our retirement years needs to be at the top of the list.
Upon retirement at or after age 65, individuals sign up for Medicare Parts A and B and can choose among three health plan options offered through the Emeriti Program that complement Medicare coverage.
Allstate's annual "Retirement Reality Check" survey examines Americans' attitudes toward, and saving habits for, retirement.