restore

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restore

To return a structure to its original appearance,although the use of modern and updated materials may be employed.

References in periodicals archive ?
And their hard work hasn't gone unnoticed after being nominated for the nal of the UK's Restorer of the Year, which will be held at the Practical Classics Restoration & Classic Car Show, at the NEC in Birmingham on Sunday.
Roy [17] identified 10 maintainer and four restorers of five exotic CMS lines while working with 33 local aromatic genotypes of Bangladesh.
But the privilege of working on Bernini's sculptures was more than enough compensation for the challenge facing restorers, said Baltera.
Van Dykea[euro](tm)s Restorers provides home restoration products and supplies.
Like many restorers, Bob grew up on a farm where he much preferred his father's 1927 John Deere D to the horse and mule team.
While discussing the benefits of the IICRC ASD training, one restorer made the following statement:
But earlier restorers were responsible for some of the damage inflicted on the frescoes.
The mean squares for recovery resistance for environments x hybrids, environments x CMS lines, and environments x restorers were significant at P = 0.
A team of Danish and Syrian architects and restorers have returned it to its former glory and the process--including the building materials and construction techniques, painted decoration, ornamental tiles, historical context and reconstruction--has been thoroughly documented in the lavishly illustrated Bayt al-'Aqqad: The History and Restoration of a House in Old Damascus, edited by Peder Mortensen, Aarhus University Press, 2005, [euro]66.
Finding a restorer of porcelain or any ceramic is somewhat difficult and recommendations come by word of mouth as restorers tend to maintain their own client base within the antique trade.
After all, he had followed in the footsteps of prestigious restorers past and present--among them the nineteenth-century custodians of Florence's art treasures, who used the same acid on the David, to even greater effect.