Repurpose


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Related to Repurpose: Upcycle

Repurpose

1. To use a product, a concept, or research for something other than for what it was intended originally. Repurposing products is common when they fail in their original market but their makers do not wish to lose the money they spent preparing the products.

2. To make slight changes to a product and sell it on a different market. For example, a book may be recorded as an audiobook and sold in both formats.
References in periodicals archive ?
Southwest Airlines has collaborated with diverse groups throughout the United States and Mexico to repurpose leather aircraft seat covers and cushions, blankets, life jackets, aircraft engines, and billboards.
Council also approved the proposal to seek to repurpose Queen's Campus in part as an International Foundation College."
The most time intensive part of our process in creating this fist to 'repurpose' unused earmarks involves engaging cities or counties that received the original earmark and identifying new projects within 50 miles of the original project," said Kris Rietmann, Deputy Communications Director for WSDOT.
One of the easiest ways to maximize the ROI of video content is the same way you should approach your entire content marketing arsenal--repurpose, repurpose, repurpose.
Repurpose has unveiled a line of eco-friendly tableware.
In order to extend the functionality of the existing Ribbon bar or to repurpose the built-in commands we must take into account the controls that the Office Ribbon provides, along with their object and event model.
Like many art teachers, she is "a collector of odd items (hoarder, some say); I see potential art projects in the most mundane objects (trash, some say)." Her students actively participate, recognize possibilities, repurpose and create in "Got Milk?
Soap reprocessing is one part of the RePurpose program, which focuses on eliminating waste sent to landfills.
"It takes some imagination, patience and time to repurpose furniture into a solution that, ultimately, appears planned and well organized, and that meets the end user's needs.
The university researchers develop and submit proposals to repurpose the drugs to treat different diseases.
This pilot program may also be a catalyst for expanding industry efforts to repurpose established drugs to treat rare diseases for which there currently are not treatments available.