Republican

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Republican

A person who believes or participates in a polity governed by elected officials. In a republic, the citizens elect representatives who vote on issues of governance. Often, republics are called democracies, in which citizens themselves vote on issues of governance, but the two terms are not identical.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Mr Adams told the inquest in 1969 he was in the minority as not having been involved with the military wing of republicanism.
Nabors's narrative is dominated by the contest between republicanism and oligarchy.
First, Martin Dzelzainis discusses the distinction premodern English commentators made, in their descriptions of republicanism, between 'commonwealth' and 'equal commonwealth' in notions of liberty and governance.
republicanism. Meanwhile the People, through the Constitution itself,
Zinoman even implies, rightly, that anti-feminism was not antithetic to early-twentieth-century French republicanism. However, Vu Trong Phung's loathing of the modern woman and his conviction that East and West had cross-contaminated Vietnamese gender relations (Vu Trong Phung 2011, p.
Civic republicanism, it is argued here on the basis of Canadian and Australian case studies, provided a creed which could prompt change without sparking revolution.
These would be created from a revived form of Florentine republicanism. In past scholarship the author has distanced himself from proponents of the Cambridge school (Skinner, Viroli).
It is only in its latter stages that aspects of republicanism begin to be expressed and are transmitted into the eighteenth century through the works of Harrington and Milton.
Again, the historiography of early twentieth-century Irish republicanism has been transformed in recent decades by a shelf of intimate studies of local dynamics and yet--as well as omitting such work by Hart and Augusteijn--Grant also refrains from mentioning work by Marie Coleman on the revolution in Longford or even David Fitzpatrick's classic study of Clare.
Ferguson acknowledged that commercial society encouraged specialization and inequalities, developments that rendered traditional and ancient forms of egalitarian republicanism as unviable.
Adrian Grant, Irish Socialist Republicanism, 1909-36 (Dublin: Four Courts Press, 2012, 240 pp., [euro]45 hardback)
It seems that some of our Islamists have cognitively emulated the six arrows of Kemalism (republicanism, nationalism, populism, revolutionism, secularism and statism) and added "Islamism" as the seventh arrow.

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