rent

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Rent

Regular payments to an owner for the use of some leased property.
Copyright © 2012, Campbell R. Harvey. All Rights Reserved.

Rent

A regular, usually monthly, payment that a person makes in exchange for the use of an asset he/she does not own. That is, rent is the payment on a lease. The term is most often used to refer to payments on a leased dwelling or other piece of real estate.
Farlex Financial Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All Rights Reserved

rent

the periodic payments made to the owners of ASSETS (for example, household and industrial premises, car hire) for the use of these assets. See LEASE, LEASING, LEASEBACK, INCOME.
Collins Dictionary of Business, 3rd ed. © 2002, 2005 C Pass, B Lowes, A Pendleton, L Chadwick, D O’Reilly and M Afferson

rent

the periodic payments made to the owners of ASSETS for the use of their land or other assets as either FACTORS OF PRODUCTION or for consumption. In aggregate terms, rents are a source of income and they are included as a part of NATIONAL INCOME. See also ECONOMIC RENT, NATIONAL INCOME ACCOUNTS.
Collins Dictionary of Economics, 4th ed. © C. Pass, B. Lowes, L. Davies 2005

rent

Payment for the privilege of possessing space one does not own.
The Complete Real Estate Encyclopedia by Denise L. Evans, JD & O. William Evans, JD. Copyright © 2007 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Renting also affords individuals the freedom to invest in a variety of stocks, bonds and mutual funds that can provide a higher return on investment as opposed to property ownership.
When dealing with a reputable provider, renting can provide many of the advantages of having a premium piece of equipment without the costs or responsibilities of ownership.
First it examines how owners became landlords renting out their farm in order to weather family crises and hold their patrimony together for the succeeding generation.
Colbert's reasons for renting the property at rates below FMV were never discussed.
The state-enacted vacancy increases are a minimum $100 rise, or 20 percent upon vacancy for two-year leases on apartments renting under $300.
To spend 30 percent of the household income on renting an $1,800 apartment, the income has to be $72,000 - in other words, 40 times the monthly rent.
If the luxury decontrol thresholds are lowered, it also means the formal process to screen the tenant's income and methodology for obtaining a higher rent will likely echo what is already in place now for those earning $250,000 for two years running who are renting apartments for $2,000 a month or more.
The Governor has also been considering decontrol of units renting for $1,000 or more as they become vacant - which is bitterly opposed by tenant reps, who believe it will lead to harassment - and, sources say, a decontrol of buildings containing 20 units or less.
Because of the 1994 deregulation legislation that allows owners to attempt to deregulate apartments renting for $2,000 or more where the renters make $250,000 a year for two years, the number of renters making that much money is now about the same as those in unregulated units - 3,840 versus 3,531.
He says the renting individual is handicapped with a mental imparity and while not a nuisance, she constantly stymies efforts by the board to put through Major Capital Improvements and other building enhancements.