Reichsmark


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Reichsmark

The currency of Germany between 1924 and 1948. It was issued following the hyperinflation that crippled Germany in the early 1920s. It was pegged to gold. During World War II, the government set exchange rates between the Reichsmark and other Axis powers, as well as the occupied territories. In 1948, it was replaced by the Deutschemark in West Germany and the Ostmark in East Germany.
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References in periodicals archive ?
(6) The reichsmark had a fixed gold content but was not convertible into gold until April 1930, at the discretion of the Reichsbank (Bresciani-Turroni 1953: 354).
Economics Minister Schacht, the man who had stabilized the Reichsmark in 1934 without resorting to devaluation by embracing a rigid system of capital controls and bilateral trade agreements, liked the idea of taking control of the BOD.
Initially, 800,000 Reichsmark (around US $200,000 in contemporary terms) were reserved for the 'Hall of the Automobile Industry'.
There a farmer with the Mennonite name of Riesen contracted for the labor of some twenty inmates who did field work in Tulv and August of 1943, later valued at 420 Reichsmark, paid to the S3 administration in Stutthof.
463,645 cases received a fine of less than 1,000 Reichsmark, 75,390 received a fine of 1,000 Reichsmark or more, 7,981 were given up to 5 years in jail, and only 404 were given the maximum sentence of 5-10 year prison terms.
(8) In January 1937, Stresau accepted Rowohlt's offer to translate what is perhaps the most challenging of Faulkner's works, despite the "meager payment" of 600 Reichsmark and an impossible deadline: "The translation of Faulkner's Absalom," he noted in his journal, "requires all the energy I have left--this cannot be translated.
Inflation in France and hyperinflation in Germany inflicted severe punishment on anyone rash enough to maintain large franc or Reichsmark balances.
As one reporter commented, "ARD pleasurably advertises with the return to the '100-hour workweek' and a week's salary of three and a half Reichsmark. Certainly many a viewer, while watching the oppressed maids, thinks we are doing well--and happily whistling fills out his Hartz-IV questionnaire" (Sternberg).
With an average of 35 Reichsmark (RM) for an all-inclusive package tour in 1934 the KdF prices fell by two thirds compared to the "cheap" operators in the Weimar Republic--not to speak of the prevailing individual tourism.