rehabilitate

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rehabilitate

To restore a structure to good condition after deterioration.

References in periodicals archive ?
The research reported in this article was supported by grant number H133C90067 from the National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research to Research Associates of Syracuse.
The relationship between rehabilitation counselor education and rehabilitation client outcome in state vocational rehabilitation agencies has been an issue of ongoing interest (Ayer, Wright, & Butler, 1968; Rehabilitation Brief, 1989).
Still others can be helped through vocational rehabilitation services to enter or re-enter the job market.
The State/Federal Vocational Rehabilitation program has been extending its services to persons with a history of cancer for more than twenty years.
In contrast, the 10% rehabilitation tax credit for substantial rehabilitations of non-historic, non-residential buildings built before 1936 is a single IRS tax form submission and requires no federal or state involvement.
Attention all hotel owners: Did you know that federal tax credits can be used as a financing source for a substantial rehabilitation of a hotel?
This increased morbidity has resulted in an increased need for access to specialized rehabilitation (DeJong & Batavia, 1989).
A bachelor's degree in rehabilitation provides the foundation for a myriad of careers within the broad spectrum of human services.
These rehabilitation projects cover the spectrum of possible uses, such as the rehab conversion of a vacant warehouse into spacious rental residential lofts, the restoration of a historic hotel to its original grandeur coupled with all the conveniences of contemporary culture, or the upgrade of an office building to luxury Class A office or apartment space.
First, there have been dramatic decreases in individuals in the VR system with non-sevgere disabilities in terms of total applications (Figure 3), rehabilitations (Figure 6) and competitive employment (Figure 7).
Federal tax law offers a 20 percent tax credit for rehabilitations of certified historic buildings, and a 10 percent tax credit for rehabilitations of non-historic, non-residential buildings built before 1936.