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Regulation

The set of rules and legislation governing certain actions. For example, the U.S. Tax Code and the rules the IRS publishes regulate federal taxation in the United States. In securities, regulations often require companies to disclose their actions to see to it that as much information as possible is publicly available. Other regulations govern business practices; for example they may set minimum or maximum wages and salaries, prohibit discrimination on certain grounds, and/or ban certain policies or practices deemed unfair for consumers or competitors. While nearly everyone agrees that some regulations are necessary, there is significant disagreement as to how many and what kind. Proponents of more regulation state that it ensures a fair market place and sustainable growth, while critics argue that many regulations do more harm than good.
Farlex Financial Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All Rights Reserved

regulation

the control of economic activities by the government or some other regulatory body, for example an industry trade association. Regulation can include PRICE CONTROLS to regulate inflation; FOREIGN EXCHANGE CONTROLS to regulate currency flows; and COMPETITION POLICY to regulate the operation of particular markets. More specific regulation may be imposed upon individual industries or activities, for example price control of denationalized industries (e.g. Oftel, which regulates telecommunication prices and Of gas which regulates gas prices in the UK); and the regulation of financial services by the BANK OF ENGLAND and the FINANCIAL SERVICES AUTHORITY. See DEREGULATION, RATE OF RETURN REGULATION.
Collins Dictionary of Business, 3rd ed. © 2002, 2005 C Pass, B Lowes, A Pendleton, L Chadwick, D O’Reilly and M Afferson

regulation

the control of economic activities by the government or some other regulatory body, for example, an industry trade association. Regulation can include PRICE CONTROLS to regulate inflation, FOREIGN EXCHANGE CONTROLS to regulate currency flows, and COMPETITION POLICY to regulate the operation of particular markets. More specific regulation may be imposed upon individual industries or activities, for example, price control of privately owned PUBLIC UTILITIES (for example, Oftel, which regulates telecommunication prices in the UK), and the regulation of financial services by the BANK OF ENGLAND and the FINANCIAL SERVICES AUTHORITY.

There is a danger that regulators appointed to serve the interests of customers will instead serve the interests of the regulated firms (a so-called situation of‘regulatory capture’). This is particularly likely to occur when appointed regulators work with specific managers in regulated firms for a long time and are influenced by the public relations and lobbying activities of firms.

See DEREGULATION.

Collins Dictionary of Economics, 4th ed. © C. Pass, B. Lowes, L. Davies 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
To use the vocabulary of speech act theory, the interpersonal relationship described in the illocutionary component of an institutionally unbound regulative utterance is justified by norms (implicitly invoked) whose rightfulness the speaker implicitly offers to vindicate.
At first glance it appears as if this regulative process was completely ineffective, because unsafe practices persisted, despite legislation to the contrary.
This process, based mainly on regulative and cognitive principles, might be complementary to the construction of a shared perception of the nature of the EU's drugs problems.
Also, awareness of the limitations of regulative means must be increased.
In addition, we also examined the possible regulative network of miR-361-3p by performing a bioinformatic analysis.
The regulative pillar refers to the rules and laws in a society and is characterized by regulatory processes related to rule-setting, monitoring, and sanctioning activities that guide the behavior of individuals and organizations (Scott 2014).
The authors argue that we have good reason to adopt this ideal as regulative of scientific inquiry, and as guiding discovery of the laws of nature when and where they exist.
At the regulative stage--i.e., ensuring integrity in our products and services-our back office teams have shared their approaches and experiences for effective delivery on member services, including databases, websites, and other key platforms.
"But nothing was done or said about that so it's just one of those things where people have brought this to the attention of the regulative body."
The findings of the paper reveal that two types of regulative mechanisms co-exist in the area that govern the agricultural marketing system: the societal regulative mechanism and the commercialized regulative mechanism.
Instead, I regard Utopia as a counterfactual regulative ideal, whose functions are: (a) to delineate the defining elements of game-playing, and (b) to provide a normative element by which to criticize instances of game-playing, such as those found in the sports context.