Regionalism

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Regionalism

In political science, the ideology that seeks to decentralize government, or at least promote the interests of a given set of groups. Regionalism may advance geographic areas and/or ethnic groups. Despite growing international trade, regionalism is fairly popular in many countries. See also: Federalism.
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their American counterparts, Canadian regionalists in the 1930s, such as
On one side are localists and on the other, regionalists. The former are proponents of multiple, autonomous local governments, while the latter advocate for metropolitan-wide or regional governments.
While his emphasis on the role of Poetry, the Little Review, and the Dial in the genesis of modern poetry is familiar, when exploring the "present" of 1930, Pound crossed into some largely unfamiliar territory: a little magazine from Mississippi, Charles Henri Ford's Blues, and a poetry magazine, Palms, edited in Guadalajara, Mexico, by a protege of regionalist poet Witter Bynner.
These constructions were designed to appeal to regionalists, ruralists, and others outraged by the "crimes of modern architecture," whose equal portions of air, cement, ultra-violet rays, running water, and food allegedly produced "egalitarian and nudist" cubicles devoid of local color, charm, and character (Hubert-Fillay 1937, 2-3).
The leading Regionalist artists were Thomas Hart Bention, Grant Wood and John Steuart Curry.
Zitkala-Sa's uneasy relationship with regionalism is most apparent in Judith Fetterley and Marjorie Pryse's 1992 Norton anthology of American Women Regionalists, 1850-1910.
Groups like the Mercian Movement, Wessex Regionalists and Devolve!
Historians of the American West have tended to be either regionalists or scholars of the frontier.
For my doctoral research, I had the pleasure of visiting archives that held the correspondence and other writing of many prominent North American regionalists. As I read through the papers of Lewis Mumford, Catherine Bauer Wurster, Benton MacKaye, and Howard W.
The turf and policy battles between the regionalists and the globalists continued throughout Carter's term in office, with the former tending to dominate policy discussions in the first two years and the latter in the last two years.