Regionalism

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Regionalism

In political science, the ideology that seeks to decentralize government, or at least promote the interests of a given set of groups. Regionalism may advance geographic areas and/or ethnic groups. Despite growing international trade, regionalism is fairly popular in many countries. See also: Federalism.
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The interns are grappling with the extent to which they have been participants in regionalistic behaviors and in the reinforcement and perpetuation of stereotypes on the basis of region and dialect.
The Government is trying to be federalistic, nationalistic and regionalistic. One might assume it is also being unrealistic.
town At work, I think most Filipinos have a tendency to be very regionalistic. I think that most Filipinos would tend to clump together like with co- town mates or barrio mates or orovince mates.
"Regional cooperation is another way to build competitive advantage, but to succeed, it needs a strong regionalistic platform," said B.
In the meantime, the central struggle in the Dominican Republic was the quest for the formation of a national state in opposition to the stubborn legacies of regionalistic caudilloism and foreign intervention, its corresponding models being: the authoritarian caudillo and controlled, caudillo-led mobilization.
Our nation is much less standardized than its critics like to believe; they generally overlook the importance of our regionalistic forces, not all of which are losing their power.
The only hope is with the devolution of power to the provinces where the elite recognise ethnic and regionalistic forces as part of a radical reinterpretation of the meaning of Pakistan.
I had also been keeping an interested eye on the run-up to the elections of the Italians: the forecasts for an increase in power of the far right and the regionalistic movements were already attracting widespread media attention worldwide.
Waterman describes Glaspell's return to fiction after her Greenwich Village period as a return to the "regionalistic" style that, in his view, so marred her early writing: "In her work we find all the defects of regional writing: conservatism, unabashed sentiment, an overwhelmingly middle-class point of view, and reverence for tradition for its own sake" (118).
Regionalistic sentiments are stifled by the electoral law that, unlike Spain, specifically bans regionalist parties with the exception of the Azores and Madeira.