Regionalist


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Regionalist

In political science, a scholar who believes in decentralized government, or at least promotes the interests of a given set of groups over the central group. Regionalism may advance geographic areas and/or ethnic groups. Despite growing international trade, regionalism is fairly popular in many countries. See also: Federalism.
References in periodicals archive ?
Around this magazine, Frederick cultivated a circle of regionalist voices, most notably Suckow and Jay Sigmund.
However, Etulain's attentive coverage, which includes Pacific Northwest regionalist writers, overlooks Higginson entirely; Witschi's rich collection of essays on late-nineteenth-century US western fiction by major scholars in the field also leaves Higginson unreferenced.
16) Moreover, it launched his activities at Alphabet, and later the Alpha Centre, in practical terms while opening a way to reconcile his promotion of Regionalist myth and documentary with a desire to stimulate a corresponding social consciousness stretching beyond local concerns.
A historical contextualization of efforts at Asian cooperation and integration from the mid-19th century onwards--which were rife with constraints (both in theory and in practice) similar to those complicating today's regionalist projects--would have been more enlightening.
According to Zelinsky, if regional government were truly efficient, regional institutions in the United States would already exist due to citizens' preferences, and regionalist policies would already have been put in place by states.
The result was a regionalist revolt against the Vargas-led federal government in 1932.
Regionalisation may be caused by regionalism, but it may also emerge regardless of whether there is a regionalist project and regionalism ideology or not (Hveem, 2000: 73).
The duo arrive in the north of England and Paddy is hoping to challenge some of his fellow traveller's regionalist prejudices, while also relishing having a home advantage as they tackle some traditional pastimes.
Botkin and American Culture is an anthology of essays by learned authors concerning the work of folklorist, writer, editor, regionalist, and cultural activist Benjamin Albert Botkin (1901-1975), an American intellectual known for his work with the Federal Writers' Project during the New Deal, the Writers' Unit of the Library of Congress Project, and the Archive of American Folksong.
Indeed, by 1929, Pound was publishing in a most unexpected venue, a left-wing southwestern regionalist periodical, the Morada, published out of Albuquerque, New Mexico by the young Norman Macleod.
This volume offers theoretical models and approaches which are attuned to the new dynamics and contradictions of a wide range of regionalist projects in the contemporary Middle East.
Sound City festival director Dave Pichilingi said: "Scousers and Mancunians are very ferociously independent and regionalist and proud of what they've done.