Regionalism

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Regionalism

In political science, the ideology that seeks to decentralize government, or at least promote the interests of a given set of groups. Regionalism may advance geographic areas and/or ethnic groups. Despite growing international trade, regionalism is fairly popular in many countries. See also: Federalism.
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New regionalism then refers to a more complex and fluid process that has become associated with economic globalisation and the rise of non-state actors such as business and civil society.
New regionalism cannot be seen then as purely a market-driven process of regional cooperation, "but there exists also regional mechanisms that can ensure social security and regional balance, with similar functions as in the old states.
In building his case for viewing Heaney's work as preeminently regionalist in conception and the basis for its eventual global scope, Russell offers keen insights into the development of Northern Irish regionalism over the course of the twentieth century with particular attention paid not only to John Hewitt, but also to Robert Gracen and Heaney's early mentor Michael McClaverty.
One other area where Russell might have probed further is in his discussion of Heaney's "religious understanding of his countryside where he grew up," which forms in his view, "an essential component of [Heaney's] rural regionalism.
The previous section has dissected how the current wave and variety of Latin American regionalisms can be characterized and explained.
The similarities between the empirical contexts of multilateralism in the 1990s and Latin American regionalisms in the 2000s are striking and make a good case to borrow the idea of modular multilateralism and turn it into modular regionalism.
32) After the First World War, with the creation of the Romanian national state, the marginalization of regionalisms according to the French model was attempted, and after the Second World War, communism largely managed to destroy the idea of smaller and/or autonomous communities.
Additionally, in order to understand today's rhetoric of regionalism discourse in Asia and the difficulties of regional integration processes in a war-traumatized and essentially nationalized political sphere, it is also praiseworthy that memory, historiography, and identity are included for analysis.
Since the end of the Cold War, the notion of regionalism in Africa has been undergoing a process of transformation that includes reassessing the role, capabilities and design of regionalism in this part of the world.
These images, in spite of our knowledge to the contrary, continue to form romantic regionalisms in contemporary society.
Regionalism has emerged as an influential paradigm in conceptualizing the politics of Asia, reflecting the profound implications of the end of the Cold War on both the structure and interpretation of international politics in an open-ended and evolving region.
While the "core states" model may seem valid for the 1970s-1990s, it was less so for Asia in the immediate aftermath of World War II, when Japan was still recovering from the war, and will be progressively less so in the twenty-first century as the ascendancy of China and India gives rise to new and different types of regionalisms in Asia--regionalisms less wedded to US power and purpose.