reformation

(redirected from reformations)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia.

reformation

A legal action to correct an instrument to comply with the intentions of the parties. If the grantor in a deed will not agree to sign a corrective deed, it may be necessary for the buyer or a subsequent owner to file a reformation action.

References in periodicals archive ?
Andrews Studies in Reformation History.) Farnham, Surrey, U.K.: Ashgate; New York: Routledge, 2015.
Burstein provides the reader of Victorian literary criticism a thorough study of popular historical novels from 1820 to 1900 with regard to their portrayal of the Protestant Reformation and its effects on the 19th century.
One of the arguments of Recultivating the Vineyard is that monasticism played an unexpected role in the Christianization campaign of the Protestant and Radical reformations: Luther, Calvin, and Menno Simons may have rejected monastic vows and the like, but much of their theology, piety, and concern for authentic Christianity among all members of society may be traced back to the monastery (26, 90, 109-14).
King's Voices of the English Reformation is an excellent and much-needed collection of sixteenth century religious and literary texts.
Margot Fassler's "Psalms and Prayers in Daily Devotion: A Fifteenth Century Devotional Anthology from the Diocese of Rheims, Beinecke 757" explores an anthology of prayers with a Psalter to reconstruct how men and women before the Reformation experienced God in the intimacy of private prayer, often during the Mass, where one's participation meant gazing upon the sacred species at its elevation.
As Donald Weinstein's introduction to the volume points out, at the time of his death, Oberman was at work on two books--a history of Calvin and Calvinism, where his deepest sympathies had always been, and a broad assessment of the Reformation of the sixteenth century.
However, he believes that true reformation is underway and is full of hope as, "We must suffer creation and the kingdom in communion with God.
(12) Dissatisfied with the traditional approaches that tended to focus exclusively on the leading reformers, central doctrines, theology, and clerical institutions, they wished to know how the laity actually received and understood the various messages being preached, printed, and disseminated to them by the Protestant and Catholic Reformations. Unwilling to accept that the official tenets of faith were necessarily perceived and enacted by the laity in quite the same ways as the clergy had intended, like many social historians they had to forge new methodologies--they borrowed heavily from social and cultural anthropology--and seek out different sources in order to uncover the answers to the new questions they were asking.
THE EUROPEAN REFORMATIONS of the sixteenth century were decisive in creating modern Western identity.
Lindberg's The European Reformations is intended for use as a textbook, and it breaks little new ground in its treatment of the spread of the Reformation.
The great strength of this book lies in its overview of the Protestant reformations on the periphery of western Europe: in Scandinavia, Scotland, Eastern Europe (Bohemia, Hungary, Poland), and Spain--those national contexts that are rarely integrated into general histories and are bibliographically less accessible to Reformation historians.
Eighty-eight leaders of the Lutheran, Calvinist, and Swiss Reformations were university professors in the century from 1517 through the Synod of Dortrecht of 1618 and 1619.