reformation

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reformation

A legal action to correct an instrument to comply with the intentions of the parties. If the grantor in a deed will not agree to sign a corrective deed, it may be necessary for the buyer or a subsequent owner to file a reformation action.

References in periodicals archive ?
The book encourages us to reconsider the Reformation not as a single development but as a coalescence of many individual reformations occurring in Protestant strongholds through Europe, and inspires a fresh look at the movement in other individual cities to potentially uncover alternative and exceptional Protestant practices.
These works provide fresh perspectives on some of the perennial issues of Reformation scholarship: how to understand the relationship between the Reformation and the movements of late medieval renewal that preceded it; how best to relate the Reformation to the drive toward confessionalization that followed it; whether one should think in terms of a single Reformation or of multiple reformations, or some combination of both; how to weigh the influence of religious and non-religious factors on the origins, growth, and eventual shape of Reformation Christianity; and finally, how to liberate Reformation Studies from teleological interpretations of the past, while still showing its importance for the present.
Karin Maag's "Change and Continuity in Medieval and Early Modern Worship: The Practice of Worship in the Schools" explores the nexus between Reformation theology and education.
The Welshman, John Penry, was hanged by Dr Carey's predecessor John Whitgift for suggesting that Reformation was No Enemy and an Englishman, Richard Hurrel Froude, caused an uproar in the 19th century by suggesting that 'the [English] Reformation was a broken bone badly set - it will have to be re-broken and set again'.
However, he believes that true reformation is underway and is full of hope as, "We must suffer creation and the kingdom in communion with God.
10) For the most part, however, historians continued to focus on cities and the urban reformations spawned there.
It is noticeable, indeed, how many labels started life as a sneer: Reformations were full of angry words.
The Catholic Priesthood and the English Reformation.
Lindberg's The European Reformations is intended for use as a textbook, and it breaks little new ground in its treatment of the spread of the Reformation.
The great strength of this book lies in its overview of the Protestant reformations on the periphery of western Europe: in Scandinavia, Scotland, Eastern Europe (Bohemia, Hungary, Poland), and Spain--those national contexts that are rarely integrated into general histories and are bibliographically less accessible to Reformation historians.
Eighty-eight leaders of the Lutheran, Calvinist, and Swiss Reformations were university professors in the century from 1517 through the Synod of Dortrecht of 1618 and 1619.
The reformations of Henry, Edward, and Elizabeth, therefore, were not welcomed by the great majority of people in England and Wales.