reformation

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reformation

A legal action to correct an instrument to comply with the intentions of the parties. If the grantor in a deed will not agree to sign a corrective deed, it may be necessary for the buyer or a subsequent owner to file a reformation action.

References in periodicals archive ?
9) While a few associations can always be made to illustrate Reymond's premise, I find it more convincing to refer to Reformational rather than to counterreformational tendencies in his later art, stripped as it is down to unadorned form and founded as it was on spiritual, moral concerns reminiscent of Savonarola -- "di marca ancora savanaroliana: e la religiosita impegnata, profonda, quasi ascetica che si ritrova negli ideali di molti riformatori italiani e che la Controriforma non realizzo mai" (still bearing a Savanarolan stamp: it is the involved, profound, almost ascetic religiosity one finds in the ideals of many Italian reformers the Counter-Reformation never achieved).
Coffee Break serves as a secret church, potentially reformational, within the Christian Reformed Church today--a church where women find their needs met and their voices heard.
On the surface, L'Evangile et l'Eglise reversed this balance by foregrounding the refutation of Harnack and downplaying any theological and reformational implications of the book.
Calvin expresses this Reformational perspective, careful to dignify all types of work as worthy in and of themselves: "The Lord .
Richard Rex's "Friars in the English Reformation shows English friars to be engaged in reformational issues--either for or against--and as a group that more promptly than others took sides in the polarities the religious reform engendered.
Goheen, Creation Regained: Biblical Basics for a Reformational Worldview, 2d ed.
The reformational particulae exclusivae "solus Christus," "sola gratia," "sola fide," and "sola scriptura" are shared among the Baptists and the Leuenberg churches.
On a deeper level, Lewis seems to compromise basic Reformational tenets about the priority of grace over good works and the fact that God justifies us sinners and claims us fully as children.
Despite Bryson's impressive research, he is also mistaken about Reformational ideas of authority.
What Wink understands to be the "most important theological enterprise since the Reformation" is, yes, on one level the old Reformational enterprise merely reprised.
Theologically the bishops supported the inspiration and authority of Scripture and stood strongly for the Reformational settlement of the Church of England, specifically to the substitutionary atonement and the doctrine of justification by faith alone.