rectangular survey

rectangular survey

See public land survey system.

References in periodicals archive ?
West and northwest of DeWitt, the old trails mostly disappear, undone by progress and the rectangular survey system that resulted in roads being laid out in the familiar checkerboard fashion with little allowance for meandering trails.
Subdividing the land; metes and bounds and rectangular survey systems.
The baseline for each rectangular survey is a continuous line parallel to the equator and perpendicular to the principle meridian.
Most rectangular surveys did not have an adjacent benchmark that could be used as a reference point.
Irregular tracts of land are, of course, also described by metes and bounds within the rectangular survey system.
There are two separate and distinct systems of land surveys in the United States, according to "A Handy Reference Booklet for the Engineer, the Land Surveyor, and the Technician," published by The Sidwell Co., West Chicago, Illinois: 1) the system of metes and bounds in which each parcel of land is individually described and bounded, and 2) the system of rectangular surveys under which the land is divided basically into equal-sized townships, sections, and fractions thereof.
"[M]ore money had been spent at law, in disputes arising from that mode of settlement, in New Jersey," noted Elias Boudinot in 1790, "than would have been necessary to purchase all the land of the State."(9) The township and range rectangular survey system that emerged owed much to both New England and Southern precedent, and maps constituted a fundamental part of the survey and recording process.
Two methods of land surveying existed in the United States: metes and bounds surveys and rectangular surveys (McCormac 1999).
THERE are two separate and distinct systems of land surveys in the United States, according to "A Handy Reference Booklet for the Engineer, the Land Surveyor, and the Technician," published by The Sidwell Company, West Chicago, Illinois: 1) the system of metes and bounds in which each parcel of land is individually described and bounded, and 2) the system of rectangular surveys under which the land is divided basically into equal-sized townships, sections, and fractions thereof.