Headhunter

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Headhunter

A person or company that recruits potential employees for clients. The term is most often applied to recruiters who seek executives and other professionals such as doctors and lawyers.
References in periodicals archive ?
The NBI insider said that Veloso's recruiter named a live-in partner of an Afro-American national as her contact in Manila.
While there are many benefits to serving as a recruiter, the special duty can be very challenging, Zwelling said.
The app gives recruiters and employers access to the more than 238 million member profiles and give a chance to provide feedback and/or respond to job queries via phone call, email, text or InMail directly from the app.
Technology Made Simple for the Technical Recruiter, previously published and released in print version in July 2010 by iUniverse was written recognizing the knowledge gap between the technical professional, technical recruiter, and the hiring managers.
Another option is to ask the recruiter to call you at a later time so that you can put together a few suggestions.
Recommendation: The Secretary of Defense should direct the Under Secretary of Defense for Personnel and Readiness to complete and issue the instruction on tracking and reporting data on recruiter irregularities to clarify the requirements for the types of recruiter irregularities to be reported and the placement of recruiter rregularity cases and actions taken into reporting categories.
Pay Per Candidate," as the initiative is called, will "help recruiters tie their dollars directly to results, allocating their budgets to only the most relevant candidates while speeding up the recruitment cycle," Yahoo said in a statement.
Getting to second requires leadership skills, which can be assessed by the recruiter on the telephone or in a face-to-face interview.
Comish added that the school and recruiting duty help polish and refine an NCO's skills, providing a recruiter with a higher set of communication skills and developing the NCO into an adaptive leader for the Army.
The key fact about working with recruiters and agencies is to remember that they work for the hiring company, not you.
The presence of military recruiters in high schools does not force students to join the military; it simply alerts them to an option.
In at least two instances, recruiters are facing disciplinary action for their dealings with potential recruits.