memory

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Related to recovered memory: Repressed memories

memory

the part of a COMPUTER that stores information. The two main types of computer memory are RAM (Random Access Memory) and ROM (Read Only Memory). HARD DISKS and FLOPPY DISKS provide additional memory capacity for storing computer programs and data.
References in periodicals archive ?
97) Minnesota has taken a similar view: that expert testimony on the theory of repressed and recovered memory may lack foundational reliability and therefore may not be used to show timeliness.
Capturing the Friedmans borrows from the recovered memory debates to translate an analogical (and analogue) model of representation into a virtual one.
It is a shame that having carefully and credibly laid before us a great deal of interesting information and food for thought he then suddenly becomes a rabid anti-therapy campaigner when he turns his attention to recovered memory in his chapter headed 'crimes of therapy'.
But, after reviewing the case, Lord Justice Thomas, sitting with Mr Justice Flaux and Mr Justice Maddison, said: "We cannot accept that there is credible evidence that the recovered memory is genuine.
But Lord Justice Thomas, sitting with Mr Justice Flaux andMr Justice Maddison, said: "We cannot accept that there is credible evidence that the recovered memory is genuine.
Pope takes an extreme position in saying there's no such thing as recovered memory and I'm stunned that a scientist would be such an extremist.
The second is her historical analysis of why it is that such a recovered memory discourse would be possible in the 1990's, an analysis that is essential for an understanding of why certain films were made at certain times.
Critics say the condition is a damaging side-effect of a controversial psychological treatment called Recovered Memory Therapy.
Chapters then examine such topics as eyewitness identification, repressed and recovered memory, the psychology of confessions, polygraph testing, evolving standards of death penalty law, effects of and remedies for pretrial publicity, and media violence and aggression.
She made the claims at Perth's Murray Royal Hospital in 1994 during Recovered Memory therapy.
The recovered memory controversy began in the late 1980s and early 1990s and centered on whether traumatic experiences, such as childhood sexual abuse, could be completely forgotten and recovered years later.
The author's psychological conjectures about Girling's initial epiphany ("a recovered memory, perhaps of abuse within the crowded childhood home") are unnecessary and thankfully brief (26).