real price

real price

the PRICE of a PRODUCT or FINANCIAL SECURITY measured in constant price terms to make allowance for the effects of INFLATION. For example, although the price of a product increases from, say, £1 to £1.10 (a 10% increase) between 2002 and 2004, if during this period the general price level had risen by 20%, then the real price of the product would have fallen. Contrast NOMINAL PRICE. See PRICE INDEX.
References in classic literature ?
For the real price of labor is knowledge and virtue, whereof wealth and credit are signs.
First, the average price of an industry's output relative to the overall price level is the real price of its output.
"E-85 is a fuel that is good for our environment and our farmers, and if you own a flexible fuel vehicle, it is a real price bargain now compared to regular gasoline," said IEPA director Renee Cipriano.
Prices sank, but when these millions of plants mature in 2007, there could be real price problems.
While a case can reasonably be made that the rate of real price decline might slow in the future, or even halt entirely, to assert that the direction of the trend will reverse because the industry has exhausted its scope for cost savings looks like a major leap of faith on their behalf.
Columnist Stephen Moore notes that the real price of gasoline during the 1920s, excluding taxes, was twice as high as it is now.
It will inevitably create an added burden on carers and the social services infrastructure and while Westminster might believe it might save a bob or two, I think it will cost a canny fortune in paying the real price of closure.
There are also additional charges in the form of handling fees, making the real price EUR63 to EUR93.
Production boomed during the first 40 years of the century, and the real prices of aluminium, copper, nickel, zinc, gold and silver had all fallen, at some point, to half of their real price in 1900.
And, in the face of real price deflation, hungry competitors, a sluggish economy and stubborn customers who refuse price increases, your choices are to cut costs, cut margins or lose business.
Domestic demand still drives the market, but export surprises can have a real price impact.