rate-of-return regulation


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rate-of-return regulation

the stipulation by the government of maximum permitted levels of PROFIT accruing to a MONOPOLY supplier. Profit regulation is commonly used in the USA and the UK to control the pricing policies of (privately owned) PUBLIC UTILITIES.
References in periodicals archive ?
Much like traditional rate-of-return regulation, this rule creates incentives for insurers to spend more on medical care rather than to reduce premiums.
Rate-of-return regulation has worked in the past, and-will work into the future.
1) Before the divestiture of AT&T in 1984, for example, all 50 states employed rate-of-return regulation to regulate intrastate telecommunication operations.
Utilities traditionally are regulated by rate-of-return regulation, under which they pass all of their costs dollar-for-dollar to consumers.
As already briefly mentioned, firms subject to rate-of-return regulation (also called "cost-of-service" regulation) have distorted incentives when it comes to deploying efficient, low-cost production technology.
Rate-of-return regulation is the formal mechanism by which ACP is typically enforced.
But Senate Bill 622 eased legislative rules and released Qwest from a rate-of-return regulation that put an earnings cap on the company.
Indeed, the main argument in favour of price-cap regulation is that it is less vulnerable than rate-of-return regulation to inefficiencies related to ov er-capitalisation since the firm has the incentive to minimise all of its costs.
Under the rate-of-return regulation, telecommunication prices are set to reflect the embedded or historical costs of providing services to each set of customers.
For much of this time, economists have lamented the shortcomings of rate-of-return regulation, pointing especially to its weak incentives for cost reduction and innovation.
Price-Cap versus Rate-of-Return Regulation in a Stochastic Cost Model.
It abandoned older style, cost-plus rate-of-return regulation in favor of "price cap" regulation, which focused on prices and created incentives for telephone companies to innovate and become more efficient.