Rare

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Rare

Describing a coin that is extremely difficult to find. Depending on its quality, a rare coin may be quite valuable, depending on demand from collectors and investors. However, a rare coin may be a highly illiquid asset. See also: Numismatics.
References in periodicals archive ?
Ordered logit results (not reported) identified no systematic differences in rareness preferences by respondent sex, age, or class.
Four species are in the Red Data Book of the Perm Territory: Flavoparmelia caperata (L.) Hale and Flavopunctelia flaventior (Stirt.) Hale are marked with the first rareness category, Sticta wrightii Tuck.
"We are the first generation who came to understand exceptional beauty, dynamism and rareness of our planet in the context of the universe.
It's the ineffable heart tug of certain bends in the tracks, the rareness of a conversation with strangers in the lounge, a more civilized way of getting to and fro.
He considered that for firms to achieve sustainable competitive advantage through resources, these resources must possess four attributes: rareness, value, inability to be imitated, and inability to be substituted.
The size and the rareness of the breed have made the animal a huge prized possession among wealthiest Chinese people.
Many buy this type of banana for its high nutritional value and rareness. Yousef bin Khalid Al Jabri, a red banana farmer, said this banana is the most important agricultural resource and it usually grows in shady and cooler areas.
While in very-rare event settings, violations of this condition may not lead to bias, it should be noted that the relevant determinant is not the rareness of the event in the total population but the rareness of the event in the subset of subjects who experience a failure during the trial.
Because of its rareness, CT or MRI appearances of GD have been described only sporadically [5-7].
Research into genetic diseases like DS is hampered by its rareness. It affects 1 in 30,000 children and is first noticed within the first year or two or life.
Scientific value of such places is measured based on criteria like rareness, educational position, enjoying ecologic and palaecogeographical values.
The literature has documented many classifications of resources and capabilities, for instance, Barney (1991) proposes that advantage-creating resources must contain four attributes, namely, value, rareness, inimitability and non-substitutability; Grant (1991) argues that levels of durability, transparency, transferability and replicability are important determinants; Collis and Montgomery (1995) suggest five tests namely inimitability, durability, appropriability, substitutability and competitive superiority; Amit and Schoemaker (1993) produce a list of eight criteria including complementarity, scarcity, low tradability, inimitability, limited substitutability, appropriability, durability and overlap with strategic industry factors.