Raise

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Raise

An increase in one's wages or salary. A company may offer a raise for seniority, exceptional work performance or some other reason. Some raises are automatic, especially to account for the cost of living, while others must be requested or earned. In the UK, a raise is sometimes called a rise.
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References in periodicals archive ?
* One fewer capital raise closed this past week compared to the same week last year.
Last year the Cabinet approved a 3% raise for the country's military personnel, government functionaries and teachers for year 2018.
Clancy Jr., asking school administrators for the rationale behind recommending a pay raise for Brian E.
To pay higher wages, they argue, employers would have to raise prices, which would hurt consumers, or cut jobs, which would hurt workers.
Raise a plate, dumbbell or medicine ball above the head, then bend at the knees with back straight in a natural arch (no rounding of the back that will place too much stress on the lower back) and bring the object through both legs (almost like hiking a football), then stand up and hold the object with outstretched arms at chest level and twist from left to right.
And this is what generally happens: between 1998 and 2003, when the federal minimum-wage law remained unchanged, the median minimum-wage employee received a 10 percent raise within a year of starting his job; more than two-thirds of those starting at the minimum, according to an analysis by the Employment Policies Institute, were being paid more a year later.
If adding labor raises the return on capital, then reducing labor, as an aging population will do, will lower the return on capital.
And in some areas, "living wage" movements have helped raise minimum wages on a local level.
PEN raises millions directly from donors such as the Ford and Gates foundations and then re-grants that money to its members.
We have to raise about twice as much per year as schools our size.
That gays are more readily allowed to adopt specialneeds children raises an interesting question: why are the people who some label as "unfit to parent" often given children needing the most care?