Raise

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Raise

An increase in one's wages or salary. A company may offer a raise for seniority, exceptional work performance or some other reason. Some raises are automatic, especially to account for the cost of living, while others must be requested or earned. In the UK, a raise is sometimes called a rise.
References in periodicals archive ?
Attorney General Ken Paxton, whose first year in office has been hampered by criminal indictments and investigations, raised just $271,097 during the last six months but reached the year's end with $2.
4 : to bring up a child : rear <He was raised by his grandmother.
The largest IPO was that of Kingdom Holding in Saudi Arabia, which raised $860 million.
Snow said she raised about $9,494 and spent more than $8,000.
While Congress has not raised the federal minimum wage for almost 10 years, some states have taken action on their own: Nearly half of the civilian labor force now lives in states where the minimum wage is higher than the rate set by the federal government.
Senator Kennedy, for his part, said the minimum wage needed to be raised to deal with the effects of Hurricane Katrina and to help single mothers and poor minorities.
This district's all-volunteer foundation has raised nearly $300,000 in two years, saving many staff positions from cuts.
In contrast, rats raised with little maternal contact end up with gene activity that fosters fearfulness in the face of stress, the researchers report in the August Nature Neuroscience.
As we raised money for research in A1DS, it became clear that there is also a responsibility to make sure peoples' lives are improved by having better access to therapy.
And, for the first time since 1980, all of the monies raised by national party committees have come from limited contributions.
Opportunistic real estate private equity funds, also known as "opportunity funds" and "value-added funds," raised more than $17 billion in capital from investors in 2001, according to a new survey by Ernst & Young.
The "venture lending" business is a big one for certain banks, such as Silicon Valley Bank, and can be a source of cash for start-ups that have raised their first few million dollars but have yet to start generating revenue.