Raise


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Raise

An increase in one's wages or salary. A company may offer a raise for seniority, exceptional work performance or some other reason. Some raises are automatic, especially to account for the cost of living, while others must be requested or earned. In the UK, a raise is sometimes called a rise.
References in periodicals archive ?
The need to enhance the return on capital, so as to encourage capital deepening to raise productivity, indeed constrains China's monetary policy to a loose bias over the long-term.
Since then, efforts to increase it have been opposed by lawmakers and business groups who argue that a higher rate raises costs and, as a result, slows the creation of entry-level jobs and particularly hurts young and unskilled workers.
Our biggest concern is that if [we] raise the money for our endowment, does this mean that the city council doesn't have to fund schools at the same level," asks Fall Church's Englander.
Start-ups just have to work harder and be more creative to raise money -- even if that means an amalgam of angel capital, corporate investments and loans.
A pay-raise gap is a gap between the raises given to military people compared with those given to civilian workers.
Folsom expects to raise $10 million to $15 million in a subsequent round and looks to have purely venture capital investment.
That measure, last defeated in 1996, would raise $1.
Annual fund programs that raise unrestricted dollars are gaining in significance in academic libraries.
To hear the egg industry tell it, the only question is whether eggs raise blood cholesterol.
Following are some of the CBO's options to help the federal government raise the necessary revenue and balance the budget by 2002.
I encouraged my sponsors to pledge a flat donation rather than pledge per kilometer, so I could raise some money even if I couldn't attend.