Racket

(redirected from racquets)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to racquets: squash racquets

Racket

1. A fraudulent or otherwise illegal business practice. For example, a Ponzi scheme is a racket because no service is offered: new investors simply pay old investors.

2. A company that engages in illegal or fraudulent activities.
References in periodicals archive ?
Pacaba customizes his racquet by adding lead tape on the frames.
Inside Gavurin's offices in the old Racquets Court building in Newcastle
Increasing vertical velocity of the racquet head, near impact, also likely improves forehand groundstroke effectiveness (Takahashi et al., 1996); however, racquet trajectory, in the vertical plane, varies among different levels of players and different stroke types (Reid et al., 2013).
When he was fined by officials for smashing every racquet in his kitbag against the wall of Court 18 here at the All England Club back in 2013 he suggested the money should be used to improve the standard of the surfaces which he blamed for his failure to make it into another second week.
Fifteen minutes or so before their time finished I was offered an old heavy racquet by my coach and asked to play.
There are thousands of local tennis clubs, gyms and racquet centres that offer lessons to suit all budgets and requirements.
Sam Matthews' mum Linda was given the broken racquet by the tennis ace more than 30 years ago when she rented a flat to him.
Lead tape is used to make sure that the weight and balance point of every racquet is identical.
Not available in the shops until June, the O3 Black is the latest in Prince's revolutionary O3 series of racquets, which have been adopted by players such as Maria Sharapova and Nikolay Davydenko in tennis.
Swedish tennis player and 1970s style icon Bjorn Borg has instructed Bonhams to sell all of his Wimbledon-winning trophies and two racquets from his 1976 and 1980 final matches.
Racquetball is a gentler form of squash where players use racquets with smaller handles but bigger heads and a larger ball which has more bounce to reduce risk of injury.
Still, Boy wagers he's now good enough to beat his son even using that old wooden racquet. He won't have the chance to prove it, though--he donated the old racquets to charity years ago so disadvantaged kids could have a chance to try the sport too.