Racketeering

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Racketeering

The crime of engaging in an illegal business. Originally, racketeering referred to forms of extortion, in which one extracted "protection money" from local persons and businesses. The definition has extended to include offenses such as counterfeiting money, securities fraud, and bankruptcy fraud. See also: RICO.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Known as ''sokaiya'' in Japanese, corporate racketeers specialize in extorting companies by gaining access to shareholders' meetings by purchasing a minimum amount of shares.
Nippon Shinpan is joining an infamous list of major Japanese companies which have given money and other benefits to racketeers in recent years in violation of the code.
The man in question is a 62-year-old executive of a fruit-concentrate wholesaler in Tokyo's Chuo Ward who was well known as a sokaiya racketeer until the early 1980s, the daily said.
MMC has reportedly been trying to sever its relationship with corporate racketeers since the illicit payoff scandal.
"The best thing about The Racketeer comes, in part, from an appreciation for the time and calculated thinking that Grisham, the author of more than a dozen legal thrillers, has invested in his clever, twisty plot.
To know more about "The Racketeer" you must place a pre-order and be the first to have this book on release.
Now, with details never before revealed, a new APHA book provides an insider's look at the department's Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations, or RICO, Act lawsuit against the tobacco industry.
For years, the federal courts of appeals have borrowed heavily from securities law jurisprudence in developing a framework for analyzing claims under the Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act (RICO).
The jury, which deliberated for two days, found that Pfizer violated the federal Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act, or RICO, and California's Unfair Competition Law.
David Witwer, Shadow of the Racketeer: Scandal in Organized Labor (Urbana: University of Illinois Press 2009)
Goldman, 66, of Randolph, Mass.; and Edmond Kulesza, 56, also of Somerville, were charged with criminal conspiracy to violate the Racketeer Influenced & Corrupt Organizations Act.
Shadow of the racketeer; scandal in organized labor.