Racketeering

(redirected from racketeer)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Wikipedia.

Racketeering

The crime of engaging in an illegal business. Originally, racketeering referred to forms of extortion, in which one extracted "protection money" from local persons and businesses. The definition has extended to include offenses such as counterfeiting money, securities fraud, and bankruptcy fraud. See also: RICO.
References in periodicals archive ?
Sokaiya racketeers specialize in extorting money from companies in various ways, such as using embarrassing information to blackmail them and threatening to cause trouble at shareholders meetings by asking endless questions.
Pegler for instance carefully linked Scalise to a well known Brooklyn racketeer, Frank Yale.
According to the settlement, the former executives paid about 200 million yen to the corporate racketeer from 1990 to 1999.
Operating under the bingo licenses of local charities, racketeers were generating millions of dollars a year in cash.
The sources said that the three executives arrested Monday -- Seiichi Ikura, 65, senior managing director, Norihiro Kanno, 59, head of the public relations department and a board member, and Masaru Kojima, 55, head of the real estate department and also a board member -- have decided to sell the strips of land below the market price to avoid trouble with racketeers, even though they were not for sale.
Ogawa continued his activities as a sokaiya racketeer even after his arrest in 1993 for extorting money from Kirin Brewery Co.
Seibu Railway execs allegedly paid racketeer to avoid trouble
Phillip Morris et al, accusing the Defendants of 50 years of conspiring and committing fraud under the Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations ("RICO") section of the United States Code.
Lead defendant Rafael Yepiz and eight other alleged members or associates of the Sun Valley-based gang face charges from a 78-count federal indictment that includes violations under the Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act, narcotics trafficking, firearms and money laundering.
Eight Nippon Shinpan executives were arrested Saturday on suspicion of giving 28 million yen in cash to a racketeer between November 1999 and September this year.
NOW argued that Joseph Scheidler of the Chicago-based Pro-Life Action League and three other prominent activists had violated the Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act (RICO) by encouraging anti-abortion protests.
Lead defendant Rafael Yepiz and eight others face some 40 charges from a 78-count federal indictment that included violations under the Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act, narcotics trafficking, firearms and money laundering.