quotation


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Related to quotation: Quotation marks

Quotation

Highest bid and lowest offer (asked) price currently available on a security or a commodity.

Quote

1. The highest price that a buyer is willing to pay for a security and the lowest price that a seller is willing to receive. The quote is displayed on a ticker and provides investors with the current price for each security.

2. On an exchange, the last price at which a security, commodity, or derivative traded. This changes throughout a trading day and is recorded on the ticker.

quotation

A statement or listing of the price at which a security trades. A quotation is often the last price at which the trade took place, but occasionally it is the current bid and ask. For example, a quotation of $15-$15.25 means that the market maker is willing to buy at $15 per share (the bid) and sell at $15.25 per share (the ask). Also called quote.

Quotation (Quote).

On a stock market, a quotation combines the highest bid to buy and the lowest ask to sell a stock.

For example, if the quotation on DaveCo stock is "20 to 20.07," it means that the highest price that any buyer wants to pay is $20, and the lowest price that any seller wants to take is $20.07.

How that spread is resolved depends on whether the stock is traded on an auction market, such as the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE), or on a dealer market, such as the Nasdaq Stock Market, where the price is negotiated by market makers.

quotation

  1. the price and terms on which a firm is prepared to supply a good or service. Quotations often include detailed technical specifications of the product to be supplied, delivery dates and credit terms. Several suppliers may quote for a contract put out to TENDER by the purchaser.
  2. the price at which a MARKET MAKER is prepared to buy or sell a FINANCIAL SECURITY (STOCKS. SHARES etc.) or FOREIGN CURRENCY. Market makers often quote two prices, the price at which they are prepared to buy a financial security or currency and the price at which they are prepared to sell the security or currency
  3. permission from a STOCK MARKET'S regulatory authority for a company's shares to be traded ‘in that market. See LISTED COMPANY.
References in periodicals archive ?
Although the use of quotations to introduce psychological concepts is relatively common in textbooks, their role in classroom instruction is unknown.
If Birnbaum ever does a follow-up volume, I hope that he increases the number of quotations from rock-and-roll wellsprings.
(Later extended, in 1979a, to pure quotation.) According to Davidson, a sentence like (6) is really composed of two sentences, namely, 'John said that' and 'Clemens wrote Huck Finn'.
When these elements have been specified, users can submit their request for quotation, upon which they will receive a confirmation email.
A facebook page, run by Women Lawyers' Association, criticised the PBC for publishing a discriminatory quotation in its diary.
In fact, the price-monitoring report of the PSA showed that some regions have already breached the P22-per-kg average quotation.
If the punctuation -- an exclamation mark or a question mark -- is not part of what's being quoted, then it goes on the outside, so as not to monkey with the meaning of what's within the quotation marks.
398, 406 (1963); internal quotation marks omitted).
Numerous Internet sites also cite the "beauty of the Second Amendment" quotation, sometimes with minor variations (e.g., "Constitution: Second," 2014; National Liberty, ca.
In this term the noticeable points is in 91st quotation which we see: there no good in living after him and at end of his government (40 days) we have other world this quotation talks about world after Mehdi (p) but in analyzing sonnet and Shiite books we have 5 things after imam Mehdi (p) as below:
Which brings us back to the quotation, worded as a question.
The semantic value of using quotations to achieve greater credibility depends partly on the audience's assumption that a particular quotation is literally and referentially accurate--that is, accurate both in terms of the wording of the quotation itself and in terms of the person (the referenced "author") to whom the quotation is attributed.