Quo Warranto


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Quo Warranto

A concept requiring a person to show proof of his/her legal authority to undertake an action. It is largely obsolete and has been abolished in some jurisdictions. When it is used, it is generally part of a claim that a government official either was not validly elected or a government or corporation lacked capacity to commit an act.
References in periodicals archive ?
In the quo warranto case, the court merely denied the petition.
35) Theoretically, federal courts can issue writs of quo warranto against corporate officers, but a court must have subject matter jurisdiction to do so.
Halliday's discussion of Charles's successful use of quo warranto to force surrender of Worcester and London's charters is among the most judicious to appear.
At the end of the day, whether it be via the impeachment process or the quo warranto proceeding, politics will still decide the outcome.
The dictionary defines quo warranto as an English writ formerly requiring officials to show by what authority they exercise a public office, franchise or liberty.
The quo warranto case is the best option for the country, an expeditious way to protect the integrity of the Supreme Court and restore its former dignity.
The Court has directed Ser no to answer the quo warranto petition within 10 days.
I strongly urge the Senate Electoral Tribunal to expedite its hearings and immediately come out with a decision on the quo warranto petition against 2016 presidential aspirant Senator Poe," Drilon said.
He said that the learned Single Judge in Chambers had no jurisdiction to issue directions suo moto in the nature of quo warranto without a formal petition before him.
The petition for writ of quo warranto to remove the justices from the ballot and an alternative request to prevent tabulating votes in their merit retention races was filed after 4 p.
Since much has been penned about the requisite showings to secure relief in certiorari, mandamus, prohibition, habeas corpus, quo warranto (or "all writs"), we will not recapitulate those excellent sources.
The government's chief lawyer Solicitor General Jose Calida is also contesting the legality of her 2012 appointment as chief magistrate through a quo warranto case.