Stop

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Stop

1. An order to a broker to buy or sell a security at the best available price once a certain, stated price is reached. Suppose that price is $50. A stop order remains inactive until that security begins trading at $50, at which point the broker may fill the order at best price he/she is able to find. See also: Stop-limit order, Stop-loss order.

2. An order by the SEC to stop a new issue from taking place because of an omission or inaccuracy on its filing statement. See also: Deficiency letter.
References in periodicals archive ?
For example, our Year 9 students were second highest in the nation for reading, numeracy, grammar and punctuation, and third highest for writing and spelling.
After all, everything, as he wrote, from words to punctuation to breaks, is part of the poem and its meaning "or resistance to meaning."
Why just apostrophe, almost every punctuation mark is receiving the cold shoulder from a generation that finds no difference between a dash and a hyphen, or would care less if told that colon has another meaning apart from being a part of the anatomy.
Mediero Duran and Robles Baena (2012: 66) gave broader macro categorisations to the errors they discovered including lexical, grammatical, punctuation, pragmatic and phrasing.
If you can not keep it straight, then "you're probably bothering people with your poor punctuation."
Girls outperform boys at the expected standard in reading, grammar, punctuation and spelling and writing, with 57% of girls achieving the expected standard in all of reading, writing and mathematics compared to 50% of boys.
In most instances, before the introduction of house styles in nineteenth and twentieth centuries, she notes, "authors were encouraged to leave punctuation to printers" (15).
But he then also did a bit of funky analysis to show how different authors not only have different relationships with words, but used punctuation differently too.
Scholars examining the relationship between punctuation and emoticons inferred the possible 'punctuating' function of emoticons primarily from their position (Provine et al.
Professor David Crystal, author of The Story of English in 100 Words and The Singular History of English Spelling, a distinguished linguist and scholar awarded the Order of the British Empire for services to the English language, sets out in Making a Point to trace the development of English punctuation from its beginnings to the present, from Anglo-Saxon manuscripts with no word spacings and minimal punctuation to Gertrude Stein (and again, minimal punctuation).
A follow-up study went on to prove that exclamation points, by comparison, are perceived as a more sincere form of punctuation.