Pull

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Pull

Used in the context of general equities. See: Cancel.
References in classic literature ?
They howls all down the line fit to frighten you; some on 'em runs arter us and tries to clamber up behind, only we hits 'em over the fingers and pulls their hands off; one as had had it very sharp act'ly runs right at the leaders, as though he'd ketch 'em by the heads, only luck'ly for him he misses his tip and comes over a heap o' stones first.
otherwise the effect would be materially impaired), he replaces his handkerchief, pulls on his hat, adjusts his gloves, squares his elbows, cracks the whip again, and on they speed, more merrily than before.
So the Political Pull made fast to the Ox's head and nature took her course.
So Ojo went up to the queer creature and taking hold of one of the hairs began to pull.
She had carried herself bravely right to the moment of the ordeal, but the sight of the four horses, ranged two and two opposing her, with the thing patent that she was to hold in her hands the hooks on the double-trees and form the link that connected the two spans which were to pull in opposite directions--at the sight of this her courage failed her and she shrank back, drooping and cowering, her face buried in her hands.
Therewithall Sir Ector essayed to pull out the sword and failed.
I should like to see him pull the wrong line," murmured George, as they passed.
The children tried very hard, but they could not pull the beard out, it was caught too fast.
He says, Monsieur, that his principles won't admit of his drinking; but that if Monsieur wants to live another day to drink, then Monsieur had best drop all four boats, and pull the ship away from these whales, for it's so calm they won't drift.
you stinkin', dirty cur, you think you're goin' to pull me," Billy began.
the first person I meet in the street is bound to be my second, just as he would be bound to pull a drowning man out of water.
When we came to a hill, instead of slackening her pace, she would throw her weight right into the collar, and pull away straight up.