Public

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Public

1. Describing anything available to the population at large. For example, a publicly-traded company may be owned and traded by anyone with the money to buy shares.

2. Describing anything owned or administered by a government. For example, a municipality owns and maintains a public park.
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References in periodicals archive ?
"publicness" requirement also addresses the concern of
To date, however, few studies have explored grounded insights to understand the potential constraints publicness imposes on organizations.
Essentially, however, the question of 'what else would we class as public law?' is not strictly relevant to a conceptualisation of judicial review, as (i) there is no prior requirement to have a category of law designated as public law, and (ii) the very notions of public law and publicness are, as noted, greatly contestable.
(7) Peacock outlines that heritage, according to its specific features (church, monument, building, archaeological site, etc.), generates bundles of services with different degrees of "publicness" or "privateness." The consumption of a public good such as the facade of a monument is non-rival and non-excludable but the former finds a limit in congestion.
The Publicness of Securities Regulation and Enforcement B.
Each of Biesta's (2013:16) three areas of public pedagogy; for the public, of the public and for publicness, can be analysed in terms of their relationship with design.
Taylor and Alexander Dukalskis, "Old Truths and New Politics: Does Truth Commission 'Publicness' Impact Democratization?" Journal of Peace Research 49, no.
Thompson, "Publicness" in Contemporary Securities Regulation After the JOBS Act, 101 GEO.
Williams (eds), Nomos XLIX: Moral Universalism and Pluralism (New York University Press, 2009) at 167; Benedict Kingsbury and Megan Donaldson, "From Bilateralism to Publicness in International Law" in Ulrich Fastenrath et al (eds), Essays in Honour of Bruno Simma (Oxford University Press, 2011).
Surveillance is the protection we display of the publicness that we as individuals are associated with.
How does the 'publicness' of occupied spaces differ from that of other forms of public space, and how does it relate to the general public sphere constituted by debate and deliberation among citizens?
But the example shows how a commitment to publicness can inform a contemporary politics of contestation acting in the name of solidarity and social justice around the state.