Public

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Public

1. Describing anything available to the population at large. For example, a publicly-traded company may be owned and traded by anyone with the money to buy shares.

2. Describing anything owned or administered by a government. For example, a municipality owns and maintains a public park.
References in periodicals archive ?
As part of the initiative, training sessions are held for executives within three levels of a CEO post at a top 500 publicly traded company twice annually during the Executive Leadership Council's Annual winter and spring membership meetings.
On May 17, 2006, in the first primary elections held under Portland's Voter Owned Elections law, publicly funded candidate Erik Sten (the author of Portland's law) won his race for City Council.
Father Alphonse de Valk, editor of the national magazine, states in his forthcoming July editorial that bishops cannot remain silent about Catholic politicians who publicly favour replacing marriage between man and woman for a union between any two persons.
Given the heated emotions on both sides, no one should be shocked that high-profile national lawmakers who have fought against the marriage amendment have not also supported same-sex marriage publicly, such as presumed Democratic presidential nominee John Kerry and U.
For example, she noted that the certifications required under Sarbanes-Oxley have caused senior executives at publicly traded companies to ensure that they are fully aware of financial reporting and internal audit matters.
The CPA profession was able to persuade Assembly Member Correa to amend his bill to only apply to publicly traded companies.
News that several of these publicly owned companies declared bankruptcy.
Jackson-Hewitt stock was not publicly traded, but there had been a number of private sales.
Polanco, D-Los Angeles, plans to contact the school board about the correspondence before board members meet publicly on Thursday, said Bill Mabie, a top aide to the state senator.
Therefore, before individuals can morally and ethically justify deception, they must be willing to publicly justify the decision to deceive.
The crucifix came down and the publicly supported teacher came in.