Fixation

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Related to psychoanalysis: Humanistic psychology, behaviorism, Sigmund Freud

Fixation

The process of setting a price of a commodity, whether in the present or the future. See: Gold fixing.
Copyright © 2012, Campbell R. Harvey. All Rights Reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
On the contrary, in its postmodernist form, psychoanalysis is a highly compelling, relational account of intraindividual diversity.
In an effort to provide some interconnections, the collection is divided into four sections grouped around the topics of psychoanalysis and the future of cultural criticism, collectivity, the author, and sexuality.
This prologue leads into the first chapter where the sequence of events in Jones' life leads circuitously into the world of psychoanalysis.
His book Minding Spirituality (2004) was a tour de force in the conversation between psychoanalysis and religion and was critically acclaimed by both religious and secular clinicians.
Without placing psychoanalysis as an overreaching explanation, the first section of the book sets it up as a useful tool that is inextricably part of modern identity.
Psychoanalysis was "so strongly embedded in all this" that its basic feature--"the art of the healing dialogue"--became unrecognizable.
The age was the postwar period, filled with anxiety, shocked by the atom bomb, changed by machines, immersed in Freudian theory and psychoanalysis, swinging with improvisational jazz.
Even for those not predisposed to endorse psychoanalytic approaches to literary texts, an inherent compatibility between psychoanalysis and Renaissance literature is hard to deny, as evidenced by Regina Schwartz and Valeria Finucci's neat summary of Sigmund Freud's fascination with the Renaissance: "Exploring homosexuality, Freud turned to Leonardo da Vinci; inquiring into identification and art, he went to Michelangelo; studying the creative process, he cited Ariosto; ruminating on the compulsion to repeat, he examined Tasso; focusing on mourning and melancholia, he went to Shakespeare's Hamlet; and investigating gender relations, he turned to the stories of daughters and fathers in The Merchant of Venice and King Lear." (1)
There is something uncanny at the heart of psychoanalysis that
I believe his interest in Freud was because psychoanalysis knew the limits of reason, yet Freud wanted to found a science.
Psychoanalysis, a theory altogether concerned with stories told about the past, has its own developed historiography, which is skeptical of certainties, alert to layered and redoubled meanings, and interested in the implications of transference, while accepting of the unfolding nature of discourse.