Proof

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Proof

A coin made with a polished die or using some other special method. It may be struck twice to make the images clearer. Proofs generally do not circulate, but are made for collectors or for sale as illiquid assets.
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References in periodicals archive ?
It has now signed development contracts with the Proving Factory to produce three sub-assemblies for Magsplit to test and finalise the manufacturing and assembly processes, and the Proving Factory is also to make the PDD device for which Magnomatics is in negotiation to supply to a commercial vehicle maker.
What chance does the average guy in the street have of proving to the court that their car number plate had been cloned and therefore the person driving the cloned car is the guilty one?
The CPA can be an invaluable resource in performing the calculation and proving the amounts.
North Bay tourism development officer Tim Bertrand says ecotourism is proving to be one of the fastest growth areas in the city's tourism strategy.
One of the most important reasons for meter proving in the case of custody transfer is to give both the buyer and seller confidence the volumes they transfer are correct, thus eliminating disputes.
They are also sometimes found next to the fossils of full-size horses, proving this was not evolution at all.
Kimmel's assumption that masculinity is persistently in crisis, that manhood is a relentless proving ground that makes losers of most men, pays rich dividends, but it is not without problems as a mode of analysis.
Meanwhile, doubters both within and without the agencies counter that it would be a waste of precious resources of manpower and money to take any protective steps prior to proving conclusively that Colorado has any grizzlies left to protect.
* on-vehicle handling stability at the proving ground.
Proving value ranked the highest of 15 issue statements that supplemented the open-ended questions and that poll participants rated.
This is a flaw that should be fixed to accommodate both the difficulties of proving child abuse and the possibility of unfounded accusations.