Protest

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Protest

Instructions given to a collecting bank that drafts falling due for payment are to be formally presented to the drawee by a notary, who is to formally record any default.

Protest

An instruction to a collection agency to attempt to collect a certain portion of a default or other, unpaid sale.
References in periodicals archive ?
Around the world it is the original principles that Protestants are adopting.
The 2001-2017 aggregate provides large enough samples for individual analysis of the major Protestant denominations.
One value of this edition of the Protestant Ethic is that it follows the original by dividing it into its two separate essays.
The book's later chapters effectively highlight the various tensions present in American Protestant support for Israel.
Saying the money is about helping Protestant communities move forward, Mr Nelson said they want to "celebrate 1690, not live in it".
Despite the fact that, following the end of the Second World War, with the declaration of the republic, the Protestant community emerged from self-imposed isolation ready to participate fully in Irish society, it is shown how negative stereotypes prevailed to prevent its full integration.
Because nineteenth-century England was overwhelmingly Protestant and public attitudes toward Catholicism ranged from mild suspicion to vehement abhorrence, the historian and literary critic finds ample material from which to reconstruct a detailed portrait of Protestant anti-Catholic views.
Most mainline Protestants and Jews, by contrast, have reached AARP status.
Given the lack of scholarship on early Protestant Mexican Americans, and the importance of Martinez's subject and focus, it is surprising and disappointing that the author missed an excellent opportunity to explore the complex and multifaceted reasons for these early conversions to Protestantism from the perspective of the converts themselves.
Georgetown officials now say they will launch a self-governing Council of Affiliated Protestant Ministries with the goal of maintaining effective communication.
This book discusses the rhetoric and redefinition of national communities by the clergy of the Protestant public churches in eighteenth-century England, the Netherlands, and Sweden.
While largely unsuccessful in securing converts from Catholicism, evangelicals began to make significant inroads among the Protestant minority, and gradually influenced the upper-class members of the state-sponsored Church of Ireland in the late eighteenth century.