property

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property

see ASSET.

property

Any tangible or intangible thing that is or may be owned by someone.

References in periodicals archive ?
Romero's Night of the Living Dead (1968), Dawn of the Dead (1978), and Land of the Dead (2005), along with Robert Kirkman's The Walking Dead (2003-present), this essay argues that zombies allegorize the "multitude" of the propertyless, as Michael Hardt and Antonio Negri put it.
Without parental rights, women, particularly propertyless women, struggled against great odds to keep their families together.
The book spoke like a novel of that great slow surge of feeling and self-making that both drove along and held together the dissiparous movement of the poor and the propertyless as they sought to understand and endure the apocalypse of capitalism in its headquarters over those four decades.
The propertyless residents of 1850s Chicago, Einhorn concludes, "would not have been heard.
Then, below these toiling black masses were the lazy, inbred, propertyless poor whites, an unfortunate group who were caricatured by the comic - strip Dog Patch and whose twentieth-century descendants were harshly depicted in Erskine Caldwell's Tobacco Road.
Part III Representation and Reception: Womens suffrage drama, Katharine Cockin; A propertyless theatre for the propertyless class, Tom Thomas; Modern dance in the Third Reich: six positions and a coda, Susan A.
When Beard does discuss women, he lumps them together with slaves, indentured servants, and propertyless men among "the disfranchised" who were "not represented in the Convention that drafted the Constitution except under the theory that representation has no relation to voting.
Marius had begun to raise armies from propertyless volunteers by promising them a share of veterans' land benefits upon dismissal and retirement from active service (Yakobson 1999, 158).
The propertyless are never agents of change, except insofar as they are sources of misconduct in their employment and, especially in the case of Irish servants, sources of wider social disorder.
the Anatomy Act, by "demarcating and isolating the propertyless as
For the propertyless and impoverished there was, through most of time, little choice but to work for pay for as long as possible, whereas the propertied minority could in all times afford to retire from work when they chose.