property

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property

see ASSET.

property

Any tangible or intangible thing that is or may be owned by someone.

References in periodicals archive ?
This is called exchange last because the exchange of the properties, with respect to exchanging taxpayers, occurs at the last step.
The third was Watt Commercial Properties, a national operation, which proposed a complete redesign of the property, including 50,000 square feet of new retail and office space.
Owning rental properties can be a profitable investment, offering steady income and property appreciation.
The city then lowered the tax on buildings, giving property owners an incentive to maintain, build, and improve their properties, while at the same time increasing the levy on land values, thus discouraging land speculation and stemming urban sprawl.
The second level of the program is crime prevention through environmental design (CPTED), which gives property managers the knowledge they need to protect their properties against crime.
What to do after the transaction Executives should periodically monitor the properties brought into or already within the boundaries of the business to ensure they have adequately assessed the potential environmental liability.
Cast iron actually comprises a large family of materials with wide-ranging properties. White cast irons are used in mill liners to crush rocks and ores.
Silicone rubber/EPDM composite show good heat resistance contributed from the silicone rubber component and good mechanical properties from the EPDM component, therefore, it can be considered a material with intermediate properties between silicone and EPDM[10,11].
A property owner must identify a suitable replacement property or properties within 45 days of selling the first property and close on the replacement within 180 days of selling the first property(s) to name a few.
However, in applying the second prong, it rejected the taxpayer's use of the patent law classification system in grouping the exchanged patents into one of four broad groups (machine, process, manufacture and composition of matter) and instead applied the six-digit North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) product codes (applicable in determining like-class for depreciable tangible personal property) in determining whether the underlying properties were like-kind.