Proof

(redirected from proofs)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Acronyms, Idioms, Encyclopedia.
Related to proofs: Mathematical proofs

Proof

A coin made with a polished die or using some other special method. It may be struck twice to make the images clearer. Proofs generally do not circulate, but are made for collectors or for sale as illiquid assets.
References in classic literature ?
As he passed your window he saw, by means of his great height, these proofs upon your table, and conjectured what they were.
Well, when he saw that they were indeed the proofs, it was then that he yielded to temptation.
He put his gloves on the chair, and he took the proofs, sheet by sheet, to copy them.
I have only the letters of Ali Tepelini, which I have placed before you; the ring, a token of his good-will, which is here; and, lastly, the most convincing proof I can offer, after an anonymous attack, and that is the absence of any witness against my veracity and the purity of my military life.
I can provide you with proof, sir--if that is all you want,' said Mrs.
Make your mind easy, sir; I shall find the proof that everybody asks me for in her guilty face.
Ever since Euclid of Alexandria invented proofs in the third century BC, most people have gotten their introduction to them in geometry class.
We do not explicitly give the algorithm in this paper, but it follows easily from the proofs of the main theorems.
When I started school, I thought mathematics was about proofs, but now I think it's about having secure mathematical knowledge," Borwein says.
This has required flexo printers to accommodate these differences in their workflow, via the generation of an adjusted set of films, in order to have press production relate to the proof and have print predictive proofs available for their client," says Sipiora.
Thus, the jurists of early eighteenth-century France (or rather Toulouse, the focus of Silverman's research), despite their familiarity with the doctrine of proofs and its new constitution in 1670, nonetheless continued to regard pain-torture--as meaningful.