profit squeeze

Profit Squeeze

A decrease in revenue from one time period to the next, usually quarterly or annually. A profit squeeze may happen for any number of reasons. Examples include rising costs, changes in regulations, or more competition.
Farlex Financial Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All Rights Reserved

profit squeeze

A reduction in earnings perhaps caused by a poor business climate, increased competition, or rising costs.
Wall Street Words: An A to Z Guide to Investment Terms for Today's Investor by David L. Scott. Copyright © 2003 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
(UPS) is doubling down on shipments between businesses as part of a $20-billion overhaul aimed at automating its facilities and offsetting the profit squeeze from lower-profit home deliveries from large retailers like Amazon.com.
Ong, however, said meat companies now have to deal with increased cost of raw materials due to the weaker peso against the US dollar, resulting in a bit of a profit squeeze.
Already, small and mid-size generic manufacturers have faced a profit squeeze from falling prices.
GEICO's reaction to the profit squeeze, however, was to accelerate its new-business efforts.
Check out The Big Profit Squeeze All Advisors Face on ThinkAdvisor.
NORTH SEA PROFIT SQUEEZE Similarly to Shell, BP is another oil major that has said it would consider acquisitions even as it sheds operations in higher-risk, higher-cost regions such as Nigeria and Iraq.
But the growth in investor payouts is slowing amid a profit squeeze on British firms, according to analysis by Capita Registrars.
The net effect means that doing the same things in the same ways eventually leads to a profit squeeze. Doing more of the same is not the name of the game; it's the road to ruin."
BUYING SPREE, PROFIT SQUEEZE In its most recent buy, announced the same day as Sharp's bailout deal, Sony agreed to pay $643 million for a 10 percent stake in scandal-tainted camera and endoscope maker Olympus Corp .
In the colony, this metropolitan (fundamentally fiscal) ambition forcefully reconstituted the 'traditional' economies of subsistence (and consumption) into elaborate economies of accumulation, thus producing not only new forms of land use and cropping systems, but also a system of profit squeeze that overdetermined and recomposed all other facets of life in the (post)colony.
Investors and business people not only would have to plan around the inevitable profit squeeze and premium hikes, they would have to look ahead to what might replace such an untenable situation, perhaps calls for government subsidies of various kinds or even, ultimately, a publicly run insurer.
Life insurers also will need to be more receptive to how business transformation projects can offset the looming profit squeeze. Alternative sourcing solutions--involving multiple sourcing approaches, not just offshore resources--will increasingly come into play.