principal

(redirected from principalships)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Encyclopedia.

Principal

(1) The total amount of money being borrowed or lent. (2) The party affected by agent decisions in a principal-agent relationship.

Principal

1. A person or organization party to a transaction or event.

2. The amount that one borrows. For example, if one borrows $100,000, the principal amount is $100,000. Interest is calculated over the principal (and often over unpaid interest that accumulates).

principal

1. The face amount of a bond. Once a bond has been issued, it may sell at more or less than its principal amount, depending upon changes in interest rates and the riskiness of the security. At maturity, however, the bond will be redeemed for its principal amount. Also called principal amount.
2. Funds put up by an investor.
3. The person who owns or takes delivery of an asset in a trade. For example, an investor is the principal for whom a broker executes a trade.

Principal.

Principal can refer to an amount of money you invest, the face amount of a bond, or the balance you owe on a debt, distinct from the finance charges you pay to borrow.

A principal is also a person for whom a broker carries out a trade, or a person who executes a trade on his or her own behalf.

principal

  1. a sum of money or capital which can earn INTEREST.
  2. the owner of a firm or other assets who assigns the management of the firm or assets to an AGENT who acts on behalf of the principal. See PRINCIPAL-AGENT THEORY, AGENCY COST.

principal

  1. a sum of money or capital that can earn INTEREST.
  2. the owner of a firm or other assets who assigns the management of the firm or assets to an AGENT who acts on behalf of the principal. See PRINCIPAL-AGENT THEORY, AGENCY COST.

principal

(1) One who has permitted or instructed another—called an agent—to act on his or her behalf and according to his or her instructions. (2) One who is primarily liable for an obligation, as opposed to a surety,who is secondarily liable.(3) With a promissory note,the principal is the unpaid balance of the funds borrowed,not including any interest or other fees.(4) In a trust,the property of the trust that generates income.Principal can be real property or personal property.

Principal

The portion of the monthly payment that is used to reduce the loan balance.

See Amortization.

References in periodicals archive ?
STEPS TO GREATER GENDER EQUITY IN THE KENTUCKY PRINCIPALSHIP
Redesign the Principalship--The principalship should be redesigned so that it becomes more manageable and not all-consuming.
Study findings revealed that financial security was one factor, primarily for male principals, for remaining in the principalship.
Although inadequate remuneration was a concern, the financial security of the principalship encouraged principals to remain in their positions, which enhanced leadership consistency in the schools.
Canavan (2001) suggested a need to reconceptualize the principalship to make it more harmonious with demands of family and community life.
Scholars have proceeded with worthy intentions, for the literature lacks a clear understanding of school leadership,13 and each new conception offers a fresh way to think about the principalship.
These conceptions trickle down from academe to influence writing on the principalship that appears in well-respected and widely read mainstream education publications such as Education Week and the Kappan.
Unfortunately, it appears that while we are raising the accountability bar with high-stakes testing, we are lowering the standards for entry into teaching and the principalship.
This article reviews the situation and examines the reasons why dominant images of the primary school principalship may be both partial and counterproductive.
There is, then, a considerable body of evidence that primary school principalship is reaching crisis point.
Our argument is that accumulating evidence of a flight from the principalship represents a form of leadership 'disengagement'.
At the time of writing, as we hope to show, scholarly recognition that something may well be amiss in the world of the school principalship has been slow in forthcoming.