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Related to primes: Primus, Twin primes

PRIME

Stands for Prescribed Right to Income and Maximum Equity, a certificate that entitles the owner to the dividend/income from an underlying security, but not to the capital appreciation of that security.
Copyright © 2012, Campbell R. Harvey. All Rights Reserved.

Prime

1. In commercial banking, the best available interest rate under most circumstances. Generally speaking, only the most creditworthy customers receive the prime, but this is not always true. In any case, a prime serves as a benchmark against which other interest rates are compared. In this sense, it is also called the prime rate.

2. Describing the highest possible credit rating on a bond, either Aaa (for Moody's) or AAA (for S&P and Fitch).
Farlex Financial Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All Rights Reserved

prime

1. Of or relating to a debt security rated AAA or Aaa.
2. See prime rate.
Wall Street Words: An A to Z Guide to Investment Terms for Today's Investor by David L. Scott. Copyright © 2003 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved. All rights reserved.

prime

To come before another creditor in terms of priority of payment should there be insufficient assets to pay all creditors.A first mortgage holder primes a second mortgage holder,who primes a later judgment creditor, who primes a general unsecured creditor. Filing for bankruptcy reshuffles the deck,as the bankruptcy trustee primes large categories of creditors.

The Complete Real Estate Encyclopedia by Denise L. Evans, JD & O. William Evans, JD. Copyright © 2007 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Were less likely to be actively taught financial management skills from their parents, with 1 in 5 receiving this parental education, compared to one in three of their prime counterparts who received instruction at home
The near prime segment also has better quality than the subprime segment and pays interest slightly higher than prime accounts but not as high as subprime, Hammer observed.
and can also be used to investigate the distribution of primes, for example http://demonstrations.wolfram.com/DistributionOfPrimes.
At each SOA, for the 32 pleasant-people probes, each participant was presented with 8 identical primes, 8 reversed primes, 8 pleasant (but different in form) primes, and 8 unpleasant (and different in form) primes; the same applied to the 32 unpleasant-people probes.
For a given prime p, the primorial number P is the product of the primes up to and including p.
Data was provided by three separate New York State construction authorities, two of which (Office of General Services and Facilities Development Corporation) manage separate prime projects exclusively, and one (University Construction Fund) that uses only single prime projects.
The drastic reduction in the Pentagon's annual expenditures of $136.7 billion (on prime contracts larger than $25,000) is forcing defense industry giants to rethink their growth strategies for the next decade.
The word "prime" comes from the Latin word "primus" meaning "first" or "most important." Hence we have prime minister, prime mover, prime suspect and prime number.
The mathematicians then deduced that the prime numbers are arranged within the spread of almost-primes with enough regularity to ensure that the overall sequence of primes does indeed contain arithmetic progressions of every length.
Agencies that certify MBEs and WBEs are constantly policing them to ensure that prime contractors do not establish them as captive entities.
Primes, once associated exclusively with pure mathematics, have recently found an unexpected application in the areas of national security, and in particular public-key cryptography.
Mathematicians have returned to the drawing board after what looked like a dramatic step forward in understanding prime numbers--those whole numbers divisible only by themselves and 1.