Primary Election

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Primary Election

An election in which candidates compete against members of their own party to receive the nomination for a political office. The nominee then goes on to face candidates from other parties. The rules in primary elections vary by both party and jurisdiction. In some U.S. states, for example, one needs a plurality to win the primary; in others, a plurality win leads to a run-off election between the two top contenders.
References in periodicals archive ?
We need open primaries to keep extremists of both right and left from controlling politics, the way they do now,'' South adds.
Option 2: Duchess to become secondary on new site; middle schools to close; Whittingham becomes a primary with satellite at Branton; Felton and Swarland merge at Felton; Seahouses becomes a primary school on the middle school site; all other first schools become primaries.
Fourth, presidential primaries and caucuses both tend to be open to essentially any Democrat or Republican who wants to participate.
As recently as 1992, the primaries meandered from New Hampshire in mid-February until California in early June.
During this period, most reinsurance was transacted on a pro-rata, treaty basis, in which the reinsurers would receive a proportional share of the risk and premiums of each deal insured by the primaries.
Option 2: Astley High becomes secondary school; middle schools close; Seaton Delaval becomes primary on Whytrig Middle site; Seaton Sluice First becomes primary on middle school site; other firsts become primaries.
And they are only allowed to do crossover voting for the four parties - Democrat, Republican, American Independent or Natural Law - that have agreed to let nonpartisan voters participate in their primaries.
Although the agreed order restrains state officials from conducting future primaries in violation of the First Amendment associational rights of the political parties' and their voters, as part of the agreed injunction both political parties agreed to withdraw -- for September 2000 only -- their objections to the blanket primary.
Pete Wilson on Monday signed a bill that would move all statewide primaries in California to the first Tuesday in March, three months ahead of the old June date.
Political activists argued that this would give voters in the primary election freedom of choice, grant ``decline to state'' registrants the right to vote in partisan primaries, permit minor party members to vote for majority party candidates and stimulate voter participation.
The closeness of the split was illustrated by an 11-11 tie vote Saturday evening in the party's Resolutions Committee on a proposal which would have derailed any attempt to abandon direct primaries in favor of either Iowa-style caucuses or the selection of nominees by a party convention.
Most Republican primaries allocate delegates on a winner-take-all basis.