PREG

(redirected from pregnancy)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to pregnancy: pregnancy test

PREG

Financial ratio defined as stock price divided by sales over earnings growth. Often used in the valuation of Internet stocks. Related: PSSG.

Price-Earnings Growth Ratio

A ratio of a stock's price to its increase in earnings over a given period of time. This is used in place of the price-earnings ratio in situations where the company has poor earnings that are gradually increasing. That is, PREG is most useful when the raw data on earnings may not show the company's fundamental strength or potential profitability. It is used often for dot-coms and other companies that may have poor earnings in their first few years of operation.
References in periodicals archive ?
Definitive ultrasonographic evidence of an ectopic pregnancy is identification of a fetal heartbeat outside the uterus or a gestational sac and yolk sac outside of the uterus.
If an ultrasound doesn't show the location of the pregnancy, obtain serial quantitative beta-HCG levels to determine whether the pregnancy is normal or abnormal, she advised.
Having a preexisting history of mental health problems may complicate the pregnancy and postpartum time (Cripe, Frederick, Qiu, & Williams, 2011).
These changes are commonly observed in the third trimester of pregnancy, such as intrahepatic cholestasis,4 pemphigoidgestationis,5 polymorphic eruption of pregnancy, pruritic folliculitis of pregnancy and prurigo of pregnancy.
Roughly 6% of breast cancers are diagnosed in women before the age of 40, and of those only about 10% are diagnosed during pregnancy or within a year after.
For example, overall pregnancy rates in northern and southern Africa were 147 and 140, respectively, compared with rates of 243-263 in eastern, central and western Africa.
An ectopic pregnancy may or may not have the usual symptoms of pregnancy.
Regardless of pre-pregnancy weight, a weight gain of more than 35 pounds during pregnancy was associated with a higher risk for adverse events.
Of the 96% who did not have pre-eclampsia, only 1% had pre-eclampsia in their second pregnancy.
Additionally, in 1993, DOH and DSHS enrolled Washington State in the Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System (PRAMS), a population-based survey sponsored by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, which is designed to supplement vital records with information on selected prenatal and perinatal maternal behaviors.
There was no history of any pelvic/tubal pathology or ectopic pregnancy.