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pound (£)

the standard monetary unit of the UK. See CURRENCY. STERLING.

pound

the standard CURRENCY unit of the UK and a number of other countries, mainly current and former members of the British Commonwealth. When used in international transactions, the UK pound is referred to as STERLING to distinguish it from other country's pounds, such as the Lebanese or Egyptian pound.
References in classic literature ?
By giving the balloon these cubic dimensions, and filling it with hydrogen gas, instead of common air--the former being fourteen and a half times lighter and weighing therefore only two hundred and seventy-six pounds--a difference of three thousand seven hundred and twenty-four pounds in equilibrium is produced; and it is this difference between the weight of the gas contained in the balloon and the weight of the surrounding atmosphere that constitutes the ascensional force of the former.
What name stop four tens pounds and seven fella pounds?
Ablewhite, senior, himself) for a loan of three hundred pounds.
A solid shot of 108 inches would weigh more than 200,000 pounds, a weight evidently far too great.
It was under strong inward pressure of this kind that Fred had taken the wise step of depositing the eighty pounds with his mother.
A keen observer of English customs relates that, being in one of the rooms of the Bank one day, he had the curiosity to examine a gold ingot weighing some seven or eight pounds.
If he sold now he would lose altogether hard on three hundred and fifty pounds; and that would leave him only eighty pounds to go on with.
I'll be bound he'd be worth twenty pounds next spring.
S'pose you like 'm, me take 'm one fella pound along you in big book.
Thirty pounds is what he will have to pay the first year, and ten pounds a year after that.
And farmed it he had, for twenty years, shrewd, cool-headed, sober, industrious, and thrifty, rising from ship's boy and forecastle hand to mate and master of sailing-ships and thence into steam, second officer, first, and master, from small command to larger, and at last to the bridge of the old Tryapsic--old, to be sure, but worth her fifty thousand pounds and still able to bear up in all seas, and weather her nine thousand tons of freight.
A subscription of five hundred pounds, my Lady, would provide for everything--if it could only be collected.