population

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population

  1. the total number of people resident in a country at a particular point in time. The UK, for example, had a population of 59 million people in 2004. The size of the population is determined by past and present birth and death rates, together with net migration trends – the number of people leaving the country to live abroad (emigration) compared with the number entering the country to take up residence (immigration). The UK birth rate is currently 11 births per 1000 of the population per annum and the death rate 10 per 1000 of the population per annum. In most advanced countries, both birth and death rates have declined over the long run because of rising living standards and improved medical care; this has produced slow-growing, ageing populations.

    The total size of the population and its composition in terms of proportion of males to females and age-group distributions, combined with various SOCIOECONOMIC factors influencing buying characteristics, are important to businesses in assessing the market potential for their products.

  2. all possible observations of a certain phenomenon in statistical analysis, for example incomes of all people resident in a country. Where it is too time-consuming and expensive to record all possible observations it is necessary to take a SAMPLE, for example the incomes of 1000 citizens, and generalize about the incomes of all citizens from this sample. See STATISTICAL INFERENCE.
Collins Dictionary of Business, 3rd ed. © 2002, 2005 C Pass, B Lowes, A Pendleton, L Chadwick, D O’Reilly and M Afferson
Populationclick for a larger image
Fig. 144 Population. The UK birth and death rates, measured in numbers per 1,000 of the population, from 1740 to 2004.

population

the total number of people resident in a country. The size of the population is determined by past and present BIRTH RATES and DEATH RATES as well as MIGRATION trends. In most advanced industrial countries, both birth and death rates have declined over the long run (see DEMOGRAPHIC TRANSITION), which has produced slow-growing populations. The size and growth of a country's population determine the size of the LABOUR FORCE that is available to produce output, a country's GROSS NATIONAL PRODUCT divided by its population providing a measure of the country's general prosperity (see INCOME PER HEAD). In 2004 the UK's population was 59 million (see Fig. 144 ). By comparison, the population of Germany was 82 million, the USA 288 million, Japan 127 million, India 1,048 million and China 1,281 million.
Collins Dictionary of Economics, 4th ed. © C. Pass, B. Lowes, L. Davies 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Population genetics is the study of allele frequency distribution and change under the influence of evolutionary processes which include natural selection, genetic drift, mutation, and gene flow.
Protocols can be adapted to incorporate use of transmission maps and population genetics of bacteria.
1987: Intraspecific phylogeography: the mitochondrial DNA bridge between population genetics and systematics.
Consequently, the 9 loci can be useful for population genetics studies and explore invasive routes of C.
Among the topics are understanding resistance and induced responses of insects to xenobiotics and insecticides in the age of "omics" and systems biology, concepts and complexities of population genetics, resistance to pathogens and parasitic invertebrates, the role of landscapes in insect resistance management, a model for prediction and management, and integrated pest management and insect resistance management.
3:30 POPULATION GENETICS OF THREE CRAB SPECIES ALONG THE SOUTHEASTERN ATLANTIC COAST **, S.D.
Medical genetics emerged from the broader fields of anthropology and population genetics in the 1960s, when, following advances in cytogenetics and biochemistry, it became evident that new concepts and knowledge in the field had clinical applications.
"Having first identified the 'speed gene' in 2010, we decided to see if we could trace the origin of the gene variant using population genetics coupled with pedigree analysis.
A phylogenetic and population genetics analysis is helpful in understanding historical and current patterns of connectivity and genetic diversity.
Paul Shaw, professor of population genetics & genomics at the Institute of Biological, Environmental and Rural Sciences (IBERS) in Aberystwyth, has published research findings into the evolution of mating strategies in squid.

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