Point

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Point

The smallest unit of price change quoted, or one one-hundredth of a percent. Related: Minimum price fluctuation and tick.
Copyright © 2012, Campbell R. Harvey. All Rights Reserved.

Point

A way of conceptualizing price changes in the trading of securities. For stocks, a point corresponds to $1, while for bonds it indicates a 1% change relative to the face value. For example, if one states that GE rose two points on Thursday, this means that it rose $2. See also: Tick.
Farlex Financial Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All Rights Reserved

point

A change in the value of a security or a security index or average. For common and preferred stocks a point represents a change of $1. For bonds a point represents a 1% change in face value. For example, a one-point decline in a $1,000 principal amount bond translates to a $10 decline in price. For stock averages and indexes a point represents a unit of movement and is best interpreted as a percent of the beginning value. For example, a 100-point decline in the Dow Jones Industrial Average that started the day at 10,000 represents a 1% fall in the average.
Wall Street Words: An A to Z Guide to Investment Terms for Today's Investor by David L. Scott. Copyright © 2003 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Pointe shoe pillowcase by Pillows for Pointes; #PSP, $8.95.
Body-care gift set by Pillows for Pointes; #GP-3, $12.95.
Rates of torsades de pointes associated with ciprofloxacin, ofloxacin, levofloxacin, gatifloxacin, and moxifloxacin.
Bellomo requests an update of my previous report on torsades de pointes adverse drug events (ADEs) (2).
** Don't wear pointe shoes before your teacher says you're ready.
5 EUROTARD Pointe Comfort #990 (blue) $23 Pointe comfort Ultra Lite #990 (clear) $24 Ask for them at your favorite dance store.
Even if it doesn't, rising on pointe is the reward of technical accomplishment that offers new possibilities along with added responsibilities.
Her movements, characterized by hops on pointe, passes, and attitudes derriere, are focused and deliberate.
(6) Pointe shoes require materials that are stiff and durable in order to support the dancer when balancing on the tips of her toes.
Contrary to general belief, Marie Taglioni (1804-1884) was the most popular, but not the first, to dance on pointe. In 1778, Cecilia Castellini, in Milan, performing a ballet by Jean-Georges Noverre (1727-1809) received the first known written review and compliments on her "flexible points." Earlier reports credit two German sisters as the first to dance on pointe.