Toxin

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Toxin

Any poisonous substance a living thing produces as part of its metabolic or other natural process. That is, toxins themselves are not living things, but are produced by living things. Toxins are defined by the Biological Weapons Convention.
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Using different cellular models, previous studies demonstrated that oxidative stress mediates cell death induced by several plant toxins, among which is abrin (Bora et al.
4), insects may find themselves less troubled by plant toxins, according to a study comparing growth rates of tobacco hornworms living in either fluctuating or constant temperatures.
People apply the product before venturing into the woods, into the garden or anywhere else where they might be exposed to poison plant toxins.
The researchers are using an approach known as toxicoproteomics to study how the plant toxins affect livestock health.
While a genetically modified plant and a regular plant may have the same profile for plant toxins, it's possible genetically modified plants "could also contain unexpected high concentrations of plant toxicants," Matthews wrote.
Though no scientifically valid study has shown that altered foods are toxic, some researchers believe it's possible that genetic manipulation could enhance natural plant toxins in unexpected ways.
The program for the evening was entitled 'Artificial Chromosomes and Plant Toxins as Therapeutic Agents'.
Jack Smith will also be in Birmingham in 2015 with his innovative board game on plant toxins.
Clinical testing has proved that Ivy-Dry Defense puts down a chemical barrier preventing plant toxins from penetrating and irritating skin, he says.
After material on principles, chapters characterize the most important food-borne toxicants, such as endogenous plant toxins, pollutants, mycotoxins, food additives, and veterinary drugs and feed additives.
Charnley (in her letter) and Mattsson (2000) would broaden the risk framework for pesticides to include natural plant toxins, and their argument is beguiling: Plants produce toxins as a stress response to predators; pesticides reduce predator populations and therefore stress; ergo, pesticide-treated plants have less stress and can produce more nutritious chemicals.
Several plant toxins, such as phytohemag-glutinin, may survive cooking and cause gastrointestinal symptoms; however, previous outbreaks associated with phytohemagglutinin have been linked to red kidney beans and not pinto beans [(5)].