IEP

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IEP

The ISO 4217 currency code for the Irish Punt.

IEP

ISO 4217 code for the Irish pound. It was introduced in 1928, replacing the British pound sterling, though it was pegged to the sterling at a one-to-one ratio for quite some time. The peg was abandoned in the 1970s when Ireland joined the European Monetary System. The Irish pound was taken out of circulation in 2002 and replaced with the euro.
References in classic literature ?
"When alone, Safie resolved in her own mind the plan of conduct that it would become her to pursue in this emergency.
"The Turk allowed this intimacy to take place and encouraged the hopes of the youthful lovers, while in his heart he had formed far other plans. He loathed the idea that his daughter should be united to a Christian, but he feared the resentment of Felix if he should appear lukewarm, for he knew that he was still in the power of his deliverer if he should choose to betray him to the Italian state which they inhabited.
The members of this party were those who had demanded an advance from Vilna into Poland and freedom from all prearranged plans. Besides being advocates of bold action, this section also represented nationalism, which made them still more one-sided in the dispute.
They said that undoubtedly war, particularly against such a genius as Bonaparte (they called him Bonaparte now), needs most deeply devised plans and profound scientific knowledge and in that respect Pfuel was a genius, but at the same time it had to be acknowledged that the theorists are often one sided, and therefore one should not trust them absolutely, but should also listen to what Pfuel's opponents and practical men of experience in warfare had to say, and then choose a middle course.
Tyler, Sr., and arranging plans for the succor of his son.
I have in view three plans for scaling the cliffs, and the means for carrying out each is in the hold.
Jefferson in warm approbation of the plan, and held out assurance of every protection that could, consistently with general policy, be afforded.
So quietly had their plans been made that not a friend was at the train to bid them farewell--the scientist felt that he could not bear the strain of attempting explanations at this time.
"I am delighted with the plan," she cried, "it is exactly what I could wish.
What plan for the regulation of the militia may be pursued by the national government, is impossible to be foreseen.
"Are those the plans? Does it matter me seeing them?"
A fifth is of opinion that a bill of rights of any sort would be superfluous and misplaced, and that the plan would be unexceptionable but for the fatal power of regulating the times and places of election.