Per Se

(redirected from perse)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to perse: Saint-John Perse

Per Se

Latin for "in itself." Describing an act with inherent qualities. For example, in criminal law, an act may be illegal per se; in torts, an act may be negligent per se.
References in periodicals archive ?
Ironically, the mistake the unsympathetic Perse has made is exactly that of post hoc, propter hoc, the causal fallacy essential to the experience of fiction.
Rigolot's approach is often very fruitful, most notably in her examination of what is widely considered Saint-John Perse's least accessible text, Anabase.
Born Alexis Leger in Guadeloupe in 1877 of a white elite family, Saint-John Perse might seem to have little in common with today's militants of creolite.
We have a duty to treat these sites with the utmost sensitivity ED ELLIOTT PERSE SCHOOL HEADMASTER
The boys go to PS15,000-ayear Perse School in Cambridge.
"With new stores like Teavana Fine Teas + Tea Bar, Lululemon, James Perse and Halston Heritage, the retail corridor of Madison Avenue near 86th Street is extremely strong."
El traductor Pierre Reverdy, Michel Tournier, Ezra Pound, Saint-John Perse y T.S.
They then faced eventual winners Perse School and losing finalists Sevenoaks Hockey Club, narrowly losing to both, 1-0 and 5-4 respectively.
The Women's Lounge also has tees by junk food, C&C, James Perse, Humanity, Project e, Le Tigre, and many more.
Upon surveying the carnage of their seven-bed-room Edwardian house for the first time, Kim's various blonde buns seem to visibly knot tighter and her perfectly rouged lips perse as the disgust courses through her veins.
Her primary concern, as indicated by the title, is to give an up-to-date assessment of the discipline, but her theoretical and methodological approach is in healthy dialogue with practical demonstrations based on detailed examples coming from a diverse corpus of poetry (Saint-John Perse mainly, but also Desnos and Borges), the detective novel (Jean-Francois Vilar), and, in her in-depth study that constitutes the final chapter, literary war narrative (Blaise Cendrars).