Perjury

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Perjury

The crime of lying under oath or making a false statement on an affidavit. In order to be considered an act of perjury, the false statement must relate to the matter at hand; it would not be perjury, for example, to falsely state a person's eye color unless it involves the identification of a defendant. Prosecutions for perjury, however, are fairly unusual.
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References in periodicals archive ?
It is claimed they knew police perjured themselves at the trial of striking miners - but kept it secret.
Just because he didn't use the exact same words from his report does not mean the trooper perjured himself, Eakin said.
The officers deny conspiring to pervert the course of justice and the witnesses deny giving perjured evidence.
When a prosecutor uses perjured testimony to convict a criminal defendant, that criminal defendant's right to due process of law under the Fourteenth Amendment to the U.S.
The report said they were convicted of murder because Pakistani authorities knowingly relied on perjured testimony and ignored other leads, The Telegraph reports.
The bank said that the plaintiffs had failed to prove that they were harmed by its alleged practice of routinely submitting perjured affidavits.
Evidence has been planted to incriminate him, Nathan and Natasha have perjured themselves to frame him, and even his own actions have cast doubt on his innocence from time to time.
Gonzales perjured himself when he told a grand jury in June of 2008 that he had no memory of the shooting and could not identify his attacker.
It adds that the book "explores Clemens's use of banned substances, details his dalliances with women, and suggests that he may have perjured himself while testifying before Congress."
Mr Kazi, a former imam at Leeds Prison, had falsified divorce papers and perjured himself by falsely swearing a witness statement for a grant of divorce.
Bernstein replied, simply, "Yes." O'Reilly: "How did she break the law?" Bernstein: "She broke the law if, indeed, she perjured herself ...
Perhaps, in the future, he might discount the generally perjured testimony of uncorroborated jail house snitches who speak with the thought of obtaining a better deal for himself.