circulation

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circulation

Areas in an office space that are used to travel between offices, cubicles and the like; hallways and corridors.

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Core to peripheral temperature gradient measurement is a simple and non-invasive technique to assess the state of peripheral circulation and has been reported by the previous studies too as a good indicator of haemodynamic status and prognostic marker of outcome.
[6,7] Decrease in sympathetic activity will decrease the secretion of catecholamines, which allows vasodilatation and hence improves peripheral circulation in the body.
In all of the above, we've been working with the tacit assumption that if DNA (cellular or free-floating) in maternal peripheral circulation isn't maternal, it's from a current fetus.
The reasons for this disparity included impaired peripheral circulation, an immunocompromised state, autonomic neuropathy, and the inability to maintain good foot hygiene because of obesity, impaired vision, or advanced age.
3 The triad of diabetes, usually poorly controlled and of long duration, polyneuropathy and good peripheral circulation must exist for the subsequent development of a Charcot's foot.
After two hours of not having a single puff, your heart rate and blood pressure will have decreased to near normal levels and your peripheral circulation will improve as well," said Dr.
The Clinic has state-of-art technologies essential for prevention and healing of chronic foot ulcers with facilities for assessing peripheral circulation and predicting wound healing.
However, the translocation mechanism of the LPS from the rumen to the peripheral circulation is still controversial and it seems that it would not be through the ruminal papillae but through the gut.
Risk factors include a family history of onychomycosis and previous injury to the nails, as well as advanced age and compromised peripheral circulation. Patients with compromised immune function may have an increased risk for onychomycosis and are susceptible to infection with less common dermatophytes and nondermatophyte organisms.
Both cytokines play an important role in the production, activation and survival of eosinophils in the bone marrow and peripheral blood, as well as the enhancement of cellular functions of eosinophils in peripheral circulation (6,7).
Certainly people who have diabetes, psoriasis or poor peripheral circulation are far more prone to fungal infections.

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